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    • February 21, 2017 7:49 PM GMT
    • Cristine, Shye BL said:

      J. Michael Bailey's book, "The Man who would be Queen: The Science of Gender Bending and Transsexualism" has disrupted the lives of transgendered persons and the lives of mental health professionals who work with them. Some psychologists question the truthfulness of their transgendered clients. Some transgendered persons question if the therapists conceal a dismissive cynicism underneath an exterior of unconditional acceptance. It has become acceptable for transgendered persons to dismiss each others feelings as deception. And it has become acceptable for psychological researchers to regard the feelings of transsexuals as merely politics getting in the way of important work.

      As a transsexual I find myself both deeply affected by this controversy and in a unique position to interpret it.  Bailey's book and the controversy surrounding it. how Bailey interprets Blanchard's mis-directed sex-drive model of transsexuality.

       

      J. Michael Bailey has a history of becoming entangled in controversy. A controversy has arisen among transsexual women who are upset at being portrayed as really men and as inherently mentally ill. They are also upset at having their self-perceptions dismissed as obsessive lies.

       

      Bailey's book is a fascinating tale of how one researcher is enthralled with a potpourri of sexual and gender diversity in the world. Yet the sub-title of this book might have more accurately read, "the scientific study of the intersection between sexuality and gender." Even with this focus, it's too much to adequately cover in a single book. Particularly disappointing for the intellectually curious reader is the lack of citations. When he had to choose between scholarship and personal chatting, he all too often chose the latter even in cases where he hurts his own arguments.

       

       

       When I read J. Michael Bailey's words, I worry that he feels the world is filled with people who purposely mislead others and people who willfully remain ignorant of truths. Despite his characterizations: psychologists, bisexual men, and social constructivists can still have their own genuine perspectives even when they disagree with Bailey. Moreover, though he distinguishes his work as "science" from the "politics" of others, he fails to a maintain a rigorous scientific perspective on bisexuality by allowing essentialism to bias his thinking.

       

       

      A book you cannot put down, a book you cannot fail to read through, because it is so full of rubbish endorsing blanchards theories of transexualism,  you would want to turn it into toilet paper and.........

       

    • March 31, 2015 11:21 PM BST
    • Sorry about that it has been a long day and me being the thick one here somethings just get to me. I cannot explain myself here but can do it fine talking face to face.

    • March 31, 2015 10:38 PM BST
    • Yes like some say it is a life style choiceYell. I did not choose to be born the way I was just as others did not. I listen to logic and dismiss the rubbish. If everyone on this planet done the same we would not even be talking about this. Sometimes it feels like we are talking about 100 years ago.

      It is 2015 now and with all of the social media and 24 hour news and all that goes with modern day living why do we still have to fight to be accepted?.

       

      I won my fight but I will still stand up for others who have not.

      It wears me down sometimes with the negative things I read. One day I read hear or see something positive and that is followed by negative. It seems to me some people just see things on the news or some film and judge us all on one persons ignorance or ideals and opinions. Well opinions from someone whom has never met a transexual and spent some time getting to know them mean nothing.

       

      How come is it that I can stand in front of people and talk openly about myself and get told that took courage?. How come is it that I can do that and get thanked for it?. How come is it that I even get asked to do it?. Last week of all the business women in this town they asked me to do a presentation in front of other business women and also there was business men there to.

      When I asked why me? I was told because you can do it. Now I have been asked to do it again. Maybe I am to bloody normal or something I don't know. I do feel lucky though that people understand me and not only understand but just plain accept me.

       

    • March 31, 2015 9:42 PM BST
    • We are not and must not confuse, those people that want to learn in order to help, amongst those people some of us have many things to be grateful for, but there are those that are still convinced it is some sort of self inflicted perversion, or they want to study us out of some perverted morbid cuiriosity making unfounded and ludicrous observations on the way trans people behave and live their lives.   Some make some of the most inane and stupid assumptions I have ever heard.

    • March 31, 2015 9:18 PM BST
    • Julie, enough already!  I'd bet he would still want it too.

       

      However, please cut us mindbenders some slack!Some of us do care enough to try to make some sense of the whole gender/transgender issue.  Sadly, ther is NOT enough genuine, peer reviewed and reliable data.

        We do keep trying though.

       

      Now (even if Crissy says we had some odd men on here), MY turn for a hug, lady!

    • March 31, 2015 8:38 PM BST
    • So Blanchard had a theory and Baily wrote a book about Blachards theory? Sh*t this does my head in. Have these people got a brain between them or are they Star fish?. I have a theory does anyone want to write a book about it cos I really do not have the time.

       

      My theory is that us poor sods are just things to be studied by a bunch of dim wits . The only thing wrong them it is they have far to much time on their hands and have no clue what the feck they are talking about. Maybe I should date one of them and have a normal evening with him and when we get back to my place I will show him something , tits first then the shock. Bet he still wants it thoughSmile. I can see another book review coming lol.

    • March 31, 2015 8:18 PM BST
    • Baily's  book was based on Blanchards theory,   although many psycologists, LBGT groups, Socialologists,, genetic reasearchers, rubbished his theories, there were quite a few that endorsed his theories at the time, who then went on to endorse Bail's controversial book, some of the so called emininant rearchers into Gender dysphoria later withdrew their support for Baily and Blanchard.     But because it was so outlandish, the claims so outrageous some of those originally thought by jumping in, it would bring them to notice to further their own confused and stupid ideals.

       

       

      Ah! the art of posting threads, writing book reviews and getting comprehensive and interesting comments,   PMSL

    • March 31, 2015 7:59 PM BST
    • Banchards work! You mean he got paid for it?. A transexual woman is a woman. It does not matter about the body they were born into they are a woman. Having a sexual relationship with a Man makes that as normal as any other relationship. I cannot see where homosexuality comes into it or any reason to bring it into it. If a transexual woman wants to be with a man or a woman or a transexual woman it is what is called normal. Normal being whoever you are attracted to is your business and no one elses .

    • March 27, 2015 6:46 PM GMT
    • Have you read the book or are you familar with blanchards work, basically he maintains that transexual women are homosexual if they form relationships with men, that the whole concept of transexualism revolves around ones sexuality and not their gender and  sexuality should allways  be consistant with their birth gender, any deviation and they become homosexual.

    • March 27, 2015 6:14 PM GMT
    • Thankyou for that Amanda,   I can't understand why people post links to their own word press accounts and seem reluctant to post the item in full on here, much more certain of getting responces.

    • March 27, 2015 6:08 PM GMT
    • There is a tradition - in fact, in Rogerian or person-centred therapy suggests that, as a therapist, you accept that any individual that you are working with as being essentially a decent person who, even if the outside is flawed, has inside them the potential to "actualize" - to become the best that they can be no matter whatever the difficulties they may have.

       

      I think that it is fair to say that a well trained, empathetic and expreienced mental health professional can come to - fairly quickly - a reasoned judgement of their client's situation.  Now I must make this clear.  I am not talking about a social or moralistic judgement.  Just an understanding - which will need to be explored as to its authenticity for that person.

       

      AS gfar as I am concerned, any therapist who dismisses a clients self-perceptions as mere lies, needs to retrain.

       

      It is that persons self perception that is supremely important in the client-professional dialogue.

       

      Thanks for that post, Crissy!

    • March 27, 2015 5:12 PM GMT
    • Thank you Crissie I will avoid that book then but if I ever see a copy going free I will save it for an extreme emergency. Are the pages as soft as the paper you find in some public toilets?.  Has J Micheal Bailey written any other good books for extreme emergencys?. I never run out of toilet paper but there may come a day when it happens Smile.

    • March 27, 2015 2:56 PM GMT
    • J. Michael Bailey's book, "The Man who would be Queen: The Science of Gender Bending and Transsexualism" has disrupted the lives of transgendered persons and the lives of mental health professionals who work with them. Some psychologists question the truthfulness of their transgendered clients. Some transgendered persons question if the therapists conceal a dismissive cynicism underneath an exterior of unconditional acceptance. It has become acceptable for transgendered persons to dismiss each others feelings as deception. And it has become acceptable for psychological researchers to regard the feelings of transsexuals as merely politics getting in the way of important work.

      As a transsexual I find myself both deeply affected by this controversy and in a unique position to interpret it.  Bailey's book and the controversy surrounding it. how Bailey interprets Blanchard's mis-directed sex-drive model of transsexuality.

       

      J. Michael Bailey has a history of becoming entangled in controversy. A controversy has arisen among transsexual women who are upset at being portrayed as really men and as inherently mentally ill. They are also upset at having their self-perceptions dismissed as obsessive lies.

       

      Bailey's book is a fascinating tale of how one researcher is enthralled with a potpourri of sexual and gender diversity in the world. Yet the sub-title of this book might have more accurately read, "the scientific study of the intersection between sexuality and gender." Even with this focus, it's too much to adequately cover in a single book. Particularly disappointing for the intellectually curious reader is the lack of citations. When he had to choose between scholarship and personal chatting, he all too often chose the latter even in cases where he hurts his own arguments.

       

       

       When I read J. Michael Bailey's words, I worry that he feels the world is filled with people who purposely mislead others and people who willfully remain ignorant of truths. Despite his characterizations: psychologists, bisexual men, and social constructivists can still have their own genuine perspectives even when they disagree with Bailey. Moreover, though he distinguishes his work as "science" from the "politics" of others, he fails to a maintain a rigorous scientific perspective on bisexuality by allowing essentialism to bias his thinking.

       

       

      A book you cannot put down, a book you cannot fail to read through, because it is so full of rubbish endorsing blanchards theories of transexualism,  you would want to turn it into toilet paper and.........

    • March 9, 2016 3:10 PM GMT
    • My daughter is reading 'The boy in the dress' by David Williams. It deals with a transgendered boy who is coming to terms with himself. He finds a girl friend who helps him to embrace his feminine side and has his first experience being 'out'. It isn't all fun though as he is also forced to confront the harsh reality of beign TG. 

       

      It is quite a good book for children and deals with the issue in a sensitive way while still making the book an enjoyable read for children. I think it would be very useful for schools to have available as well as those children who have a family member who is transgendered as it may help them to start to understand the issue. 

    • August 26, 2015 12:49 PM BST
    • The most recent reviews of ‘Chrissie Rhymes with Sissy’

      Review No. 1

      An intense account of the main character's steady process of being forcibly feminized over a protracted period. There are many twists and turns to the story, some of which may test the limits of your ability to accept sexual practices that verge on taboo in our culture. If you are willing to go along with the author, you will learn much about feminization, submission, dominance and the life of a true sissy. This is not a book for everyone, but it is articulate, engaging and compelling.

      Review No. 2

      An outstanding account of forced feminization, not for the faint hearted. Buy this and I can assure you will not be disappointed. This story hits all the spots on a sissy’s journey into total submission.

      You can preview the book here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01438T7E4

      I hope you enjoy it.

      Chrissie

      xxxxx

    • June 3, 2015 2:11 PM BST
    • This book follows the transition of "Sean" to "Katie" in a rather heartfelt and fairly seriously presented novel.

       

      This is probably one of the more serious books I've read of late that falls inbetween the fiction and factual realms of Trangendered writing. A lot of subjects get covered here by the author that may be very close to home for members of the TG and perhaps the TS Community more specifically. There are a few nice diversions but not much and if you're not interested in the core material you probably wouldn't find much else to keep you reading. Suicide, Drug Addiction, Family Rejection, Friendships, Encouragement and Financial Strain feature heavily within this book as Sean decides to discard his falsehoods and start living to a point of not having any regrets.

       

      An interesting read although a couple of points in the book seem a little unresolved or could perhaps have done with some more elaboration.

      4.5/5 stars

       

      Available on Kindle

    • May 31, 2015 7:20 PM BST
    • Sam comes across "The Parts Store" at a time when he's really feeling low. He's been bald since a very early age adn the promise of the store to provide any part (reinforced by the window display) sends him on a rather mysterious journey about trying to align his Ka with his outer image and fighting the daemon |Shame.

       

      Ok it's fiction......

      One of those books that Kindle decides to recommend to you based on your previous purchases of which a relatively large collection are Gender related (mixed in with spy/action/religious thrillers). This books worth a bit of a laugh, if only because it draws on a lot of cliche's inlcuding the rather mysteriou sowner of the Parts Store and the seemingly inevitable events that lead Sam on his journey. Its an interesting if somewhat predictable but gratefully it doesn't focus (too) heavily on the sex related topics that often hinder these kinds of books.

       

      I'd give it 2/5 stars as it's no literary marvel

       

      Available on Kindle

    • May 26, 2015 2:20 PM BST
    • Michael's a Royal Marine who suddenly falls very ill.

      Discovering the illness is a severe allergic reaction to testosterone Michael is forced to become a girl and this books follows her trials and tribulations as she comes to terms with being the opposite gender and no longer being ale to do the job she wishes to continue (fighting on the front lines).

       

      I enjoyed htis book but perhaps I am becoming a little too familiar with Tanya's writing and her books seem to be a little "too good to be true" which undoubtedly tends to happen in fiction works. That said the books passes through some interesting phases and explores some interesting topics including over compensating by males (and the long term effects of such) and desires of males to please their parents. Of course our main character already has an underlying desire to be female so pretty quickly becomes acclimatised to her sudden and inavoidable change but I couldn't help feeling this might have been so much better had the main character not actually wanted to be a girl underneath (and thus had a much greater struggle in coming to terms with their new life).

       

      |Some of the structure of the book becomes hard to follow as Tanya starts each chapter by brushing on the end of an event and then revisiting it through the chapter in retrospect. This generally works but occasionally feels like the author becomes confused as to where exactly she is in the story.

       

      I'd probably give this 2.5/5 stars as the book covers topics I find of interest but it's not an exceptional book by any means and leaves a lot of ground that is never explored (that could have been very interesting).

       

      Available on Kindle

    • May 18, 2015 8:04 PM BST
    • Must be good.....

    • May 18, 2015 7:08 PM BST
    • Well read my review on the link before you waste your time, lol. 

    • May 18, 2015 6:58 PM BST
    • Not yet but it is on my reading list. I have admittedly enjoyed these fiction type books from Allan but as is common in fiction sometimes serious issues that arise are left undisclosed.

    • May 18, 2015 5:21 PM BST
    • Unfortunately, books, fiction or so called proffesional research books , when it comes to dealing with transgendered subjects are mostly a hit or miss experience or ust plain rubbish, have you read ''The man who would be queen'' by bailey,   http://gendersociety.com/forums/topic/9978/j-michael-bailey-quot-the-ma

       

    • May 18, 2015 1:54 PM BST
    • Em's had a rough time in life having lost all the people he loves and cares about. But he likes to write Transgendered fiction and post his efforts in an online forum where he meets a reclusive billionaire/scientist who makes Em an offer. Based on a concept that Tanya's been exploring in several books involving the reverting of the body to its stage during conception where it is neither male or female and then triggering redevelopment with the desired gender it poses some interesting questions.

       

      Plot aside and the, of course, inevitable hapy ending this book raises some very seroius issues which it doesn't really attempt to discuss. Foremost and perhaps paramount, is the untested experimentation on human subjects who are undoubtedly at very perilous and vulnerable stages of life. Perhaps most worrying was an unforseen medical complication while one of his "patients" is away and not under his diret supervision. However, these aspects of the book aren't really discussed in great detail or the issues particularly explored in great depth which is quite a shame (perhaps something that needs greater looking into in a more fatual presented work).

       

      its certainly a worthy read but it doesn't explore or expand on some of the issues it appears to raise and instead focusses more heavily on |Tanya's general trademark of inter-relationship issues that occur between Transgendered individuals and the other main characters.

       

      Available through Kindle

    • May 18, 2015 1:22 PM BST
    • Terry's a guy, or so he says. Everyone else he meets seems inclined to disagree. Struggling financially as an artist in London and doing very poorly at relationships things start to change when he meets an apparition of an apparenty dead Countess who vanishes but Terry finds himself drawn to the home of the reclusive and still mourning count. Things immediately become interesting as Terry bears a striking resemblance to the deceased Countess in physical appearances and name (Theresa which she preferred be shortened to Terri).

       

      It's hard to say if I enjoyed this book or not as the supernatural elements mixed in with what is essentially a fairy tale type TG transformation that has some semblences of Cinderella left me feeling a bit cheated. Terry/Terri is also arguably not really Transgendered but has simply been a bit sexually frustrated due to his afeminate appearance. That said, the exploration of the characters and their relationships becomes intriguing as Terry/Terri fights for her own independance and identity whilst clearly representing someone from the past for the other two main characters (A husband who's struggling with the apparent resemblance to his deceased wife and a brother who is having equal difficulties moving on). The eventual story seems a little too fairy tale-ish for me as the frustrated young man becomes the doted upon and (although retaining some basic roots in simplicity and simpleton style) the ever elegantly presented woman.

       

      An interesting read but might put off some Transgendered individuals who have had to go through the severe and traumatic experiences of transition compared to the one undergone in this fictional one.

       

      Available through Kindle

    • May 18, 2015 2:09 AM BST
    • They are available on the Amazon Kindle e Book store.go to www.amazon.com and do a search for the authors name.

    • May 18, 2015 2:00 AM BST
    • where are you finding these stories is ther a website or are these in a collection

    • May 17, 2015 5:08 PM BST
    • What happens if you save an Alien's life but they can't save your own in return?

      Of course you get cloned, as the opposite gender and asked to return as their inconspicious emissary. Of course when you have Aliens in control of the cloning process things may not turn out as inconspicious as you might expect when Mike returns to planet Earth as Michelle, a 6'3" combination of multiple feminine role models (including Weaving from Alien and Angelina Jolie from Tomb Raider among others).

       

      Its an interesting and unusual book where the Transgendered issues take a semi back seat while the book takes tmore time to explore Michelle's general mental and physical prowess bestowed upon her by the aliens. That said there are some interesting things and circumstances that pop up both due to her changed gender and her powers. The book is mainly an action novel/sci-fi combination with a scattering of humour mixed in that some Crossdressers/Transexuals might appreciate (6'3" girl tottering about in heels trying to look inconspicious anyone?).

       

      A good light hearted read with a touch of humour and a side nod to the TG Community.

       

      Available on Kindle

    • May 17, 2015 3:42 PM BST
    • This book represents my first ever exposure to Transgender related novels. Based around the true sotry of Einar Wegener, a Danish painter, and his wife. Supposedly made into  a film that I have no luck in locating.

       

      The book centers around Einar's transformation into Lily which is set off by a simple request from his wife, also a painter, for Einar to pose for her so she could finish off a commissioned portrait. Its a very touching book although a little difficult to read (it is certainly not my normal fast paced action fiction). Based in  a time when Transgendered individuals were rarely heard of it is a bt heart-breaking after Lily undergoes one of the first ever SRS/GRS surgeries only to pass away shortly thereafter.

       

      It's a much more mature and down to earth look at transexuality at a time when the psychology, concepts and conditions were only a murmur. Perhaps most remarkable at this time point is that Einar's wife doesn't leave him even if she does eventually make some rather serious decisions of her own (and draws some of her own lines in the sand). If there's a book that you must read about a real-life story then this is probably one of the key players that should be sitting in your library.

       

      Available from Amazon in Paper back and you may also find it in some LGBT specific bookstores.

    • May 17, 2015 2:44 PM BST
    • While this is a stand-alone book that can be read without prior knowledge it makes reference to characters and back stories that occur in the "When Fortune Smiles" and "Changed Fortune" which might lead you a greater level of enjoyment and/or understanding of this book.

       

      Max has money problems....

      He's a female impersonator doing a show at a 2-bit nightclub but he's no Drag Queen. The performances are a labour of love requiring the learning of every nuance, the songs and the personficiation of the artist in question and he loves newer and unexplored female stars. But Max suddenly gets a job offer to take his stage performance into real life and impersonate his favourite singer, 24/7 in a subterfuge masterminded by the SIS. With the world his stage, Max finds living en-femme is more the life he's always dreamed of (apparently) and with forced necessity to pull this off "as real" as possible he is taken to extreme lengths (Boob job, bit of a tuck and an anit-estrogen jab) which leaves him facing issues of being Transgendered he'd been putting off for years.

       

      This was an interesting read with plenty of action (which suits me as I'm a big Robert Ludlum fanatic). On that note its a good read though certainly not up to the standards of the big name authors that spring to mind (Robert Ludlum, |Tom Clance among others). There's some good interaction here between characters and some in-depth look at some of the issues that Max faces through the book but I couldn't help feeling like it was really only scratching the surface of many internal turmoils that Max/Maxine might have been facing. Its certainly worth a look if you enjoyed the Fortne books and would like to see a continuation, if somewhat removed, plot-line.

       

      Available on Kindle

    • May 17, 2015 11:03 AM BST
    • This book is the second in the series of Fortune books and is preceded by "When Fortune Smiles" which I would recommend reading first. Also loosely related to "The Other" which mentions and coincides with some of the characters explored in this and the prevoius Fortune book.

       

      Here we return to the explorations and adventures of Miss fortune (Josie) who has just graduated from University in criminology and as a Post-Op Transexual is attempting to make a bit of a break from her past in Oxford. But despite reassurances from people close to her she's finding it difficult to let go of her past and that the spectre of being a ransgendered individual continues to influence her lifestyle choices. Josie finds herself in an enigmatic new job that requires a certain level of resilliance and calls on her skillset that is arguably reinforced by her personal struggles.

       

      This book is certainly a welcome addition and continuation of the Fortune series and explores some new topics while retaining some links to older ones raised in the first book. The battle Josie faces and explores here that surrounds her own misgivings about her capabilities and in particular, her inability to conceive and how this will affect her personal relationships, will certainly capture some hearts in the Transgendered community. Having said that, the repitive focus on this point does sometimes detract a little from the spy novel aspects of the book itself and the story. Some light humour breaks the book up a little also which is a nice touch that might bring a smile to those who've trodden the path of Transexuality.

       

      Overall a good read and if you enjoyed the first book int he series is worth a look if only to get some closure on the previous story (its left a little open ended).

       

      Available on Kindle

    • May 17, 2015 10:45 AM BST
    • This is the first book in a sort of series with the second one being "Changed Fortune" (directly related) and "The Offer" (a loosely related book that partly involves some of the mainc haracters the Fortune series and hence may benifit from prior reading).

       

      This book explores the story of Joseph who has always wanted to be a girl and is currently expressing this mostly by doing a amateur drag queen show at a local TG Friendly nightclub. With a remarkable rsemblance to his sister (Jessica) the main character becomes involved in several relationships which put Joseph/Josie into deep bouts of contemplative thought about herself and her future. Things come to an interesting head when she is asked to double her own sister, a travel representative, at a Ski Resort whilst inadvertently becoming involved in a criminal investigation.

       

      This book is enjoyable for its odd mix of relationships and how they are explored. Particularly as Josie makes new friends whilst exploring old friendships. Other parts of the story add a touch of excitement to the novel and adds a little humour with the various levels of subterfuge (including the bad guys looking for someone of the wrong gender). Not much of the book itself focusses on the actual transition but it is nonetheless and enjoyable fiction book that covers several related topics that are likely to interest a Transgendered audience.

       

      An entertaining read if somewhat light (on the actual transition phase) that explores transexualism and the various relationships in which one might find oneself while going through a similar process (Family, friends, academic staff, police) with an interesting bit of fiction thrown in to give the book a slight mystery edge.

       

      Available on Kindle

    • August 28, 2014 1:48 AM BST
    • I have to admit, I found many parts of Richard's book hard to read, because they reminded me so much of myself.  The secret hiding places, telling your lover or spouse as little as you can about how you REALLY feel because you love them and don't want to lose them.

       

      I was a type 6 transsexual from the time I was 6 years old.  It took a great deal of effort just to TRY to PASS as a guy - my birth gender.  In my case, I did tell my parents, when I was six, but my parents found out that the "cure" was the electro-shock and lobotomy Richard talks about at the end of his book.  I was reading Richard's book while tending my dad just before his death.  I asked him if that was why they didn't support my transition when I was young.  Dad told me that mom had already gone through that horror and she'd do anything to keep you from having to endure even a little of it.  Back in 1961, a boy who wanted to be a girl was considered psychotic, to be treated with extreme measures, to break him of the delusions of wanting to be a woman.  After all, no sane man would want to be a girl, would they?

       

      Even though Christine Jorgensen was famous by then, much of the medical research and treatment was not.  Even most medical professionals did not know that there were doctors in United States Hospitals like Johns Hopkins that perform sex change operations and provided HRT.

       

      At the same time, I struggled with the whole "open marriage" concept.  My first wife wanted me to be faithful, but she wanted a "real man" as a lover.  Too often, an "open marriage" seems to be a "one way door".

       

      Richard has been a pioneer in providing empirical research into transsexuals, and as a result, more research has been done with some amazing and alarming discoveries.  In the few years since his book was published, with references to his original research, more studies, some with over 1 million respondents, have been conducted.  The suicide rates were quite shocking, as were the mortality and morbidity rates, especially of those who had been denied support for transition.  This was sharply contrasted by the successes and health of those who had transitioned.  The studies were so overwhelming and convincing that the APA and AMA have now adopted a policy that it is UNETHICAL to try and force a true transsexual to be gender conformant.

       

      There are a few other excellent books that provide more medical and professional viewpoints.  "The Squirrel Cage" for example, is written by someone who did transition, and has done further empirical studies.

       

      I remember a time when even going to the downtown public library, the biggest library in the state, I couldn't find even a single book on what we now call transgender issues - fiction or non-fiction.  Today, on Amazon, there are over 300 books with transgender themes available on Kindle.  The quality ranges from bad porn to brilliantly written drama.  The world has changed so much.  I'm so glad it has.

       

      When I read Richard's book, I was seriously considering attempting transition again.  I had tried when I was in my thirties, but had to abort when my ex-wife threatened to make sure I never saw my children again, but would still have to pay child support. She had connections through her church and the sister of her new husband into social workers, courts, and judges.

       

      When my dad was about to die, he told me "If I can't give you anything else, I want you to have this, BE YOURSELF, IF THAT'S DEBBIE, then BE DEBBIE!".  He had seen Debbie's postings on facebook, had friended both Debbie and Rex, and he realized that the reason he never really knew his son was because she was his daughter.  We had about 5 days together before he passed, and we loved each other more in those last few days that we had in all the time before.  Dad always loved me, but always wondered why I was so "phony", like an actor, a clown, hiding behind an emotional mask.  When I was finally free to take down the mask, I could be authentic with him, and he loved it, and loved me.  His only regret was that he hadn't gotten to know Debbie sooner.

       

       

       

    • May 8, 2014 7:08 PM BST
    • Might have to read this one.

    • July 12, 2013 6:53 PM BST
    • Richard is a pioneer in transgender studies, and was one of the first to begin doing empirical studies, researching the experiences of thousands of transgendered people, ranging from cross-dressers to post-op transsexuals.  He also included research into FtM as well as MtF transgender issues.

       

      The story is his personal story.  Reading it, I found that I could relate to so much of his experiences, and at the same time, it helped me to see that I would need more than what he settled for.

       

      I find it interesting that people are upset at how he progressed through the issues.  What society, and often us, so often forget is how much manipulation, coercion, and even brutal FORCE is used to try force transgenders, especially MtF transgenders to be gender role conformant.

       

      In many ways, my parents were very supportive.  My mom taught me how to sew, crochet, knit, cook, do laundry, and in many ways become a wonderful housewife.  She even tried to help me get some clothes by taking me shopping with her when we were both the same size, and let me pick out the clothes I liked.  She'd usually wear it once or twice and then it would end up in the "donate" pile, meaning that I could keep it if I wanted.

       

      What I DIDN'T know, until just before my father died, was that they were trying to protect me from something really terrible.  Back in the 1950s and 1960s, even into the early 1970s, the treatement for transsexuals was electro-shock, and if that didn't work, a minor lobotomy, and if that failed, a full frontal lobotomy - living as a vegetable.

       

      Back in those days, Electroshock was more like torture.  They would strap you to the table, put a stick in your mouth so you didn't bite your tongue off, and then apply the voltage.  Untill you "zapped out", it was torture, muscles cramping, convulsing, and pain.  My mother had experienced it first hand from the time I was 2 until I was about 7.  The treatments were daily, and it often took 4-5 people to catch her, hold her down, and get her strapped down, she fought so bad.  They would tell her the next day that she wouldn't be getting another shock, but then they would have to strap her down again.  This happened every day for 30 days in a row, for over 3 years.  Mom has no memory of me for the first 3 years of my life.

       

      I was reading Richard's book when my father was dying.  I asked him about it, and he told me that this is why they had tried so hard NOT to let me dress or be a girl.  My dad also wanted to try and spare me the pain he had gone through when he was a "sissy".  He even lost any chance at promotion because he wore a pink tie to work.

       

      I often wish there had been someone I could have talked to about my desire to be a girl.  I went to many tharapists, some on a daily basis.  I was also in group therapy for almost 9 months on a daily basis.  Yet when I tried to share my desire to be a girl (I was 8-10) at the time, or a woman (at age 21), they told me that I couldn't even TALK about that, because it "wasn't appropriate".  Often the reaction was "We know about that, but you CANNOT talk about it, ever, with us".

       

      A also went through many of the same trials and ordeals as Alice/Richard - being beat up by the boys, losing girl-friends, losing a fiance', even losing my job and later my children.  At one point, I didn't see my children for over 3 years, even though I had stopped transition so that I would have visitation.  I couldn't even make decisions like wanting them to have a computer and access to the Internet.

       

      I've written my own story, Debbie's Secret Life, which addresses some of these issues as well.

       

      We often hear about the transsexual who transitions, but we rarely hear the story of those transsexuals who feel forced to live in "stealth mode", fearful that if ANYONE knew their secret, that they would lose EVERYTHING.  I have said it felt like being a Jewish woman in Nazi Germany.  You could act like what you weren't, but if anyone found out who you were, it couldbe worse than death.

       

      Shortly after dad's death, I went back to therapy.  It only took a few sessions for the therapist to see how much happier I was as Debbie, and how uncomfortable I was with being Rex (I came as both).

    • August 11, 2012 9:08 AM BST
    • I must admit to being torn by the book. On the one hand I was amazed by the life he constructed and on the other hand somewhat horrified. It seemed he got everything his way. Monday to Friday respected professional and then for the weekend a completely separate life including a male partner. It is a few years since I read the book but I cannot remember getting a feel on what his family felt. I was concerned about his "playing at prostitution" and wondered if I needed help with my gender issues is this the person I could rely on for solid advice. Alternatively it could be sour grapes on my part as to some he could be considered to be living the dream. I still think Jenny Boylan is the best!!!!

    • July 24, 2012 1:58 PM BST
    • Richard never shies away from sharing those difficult questions that plague us all, at one time or another, but he also doesn’t fall into the trap of assuming he has all the answers. In fact, one of the elements of his story that rang most true for me is the series of rules he comes up with to try and apply a logical, intellectual structure to what is entirely an irrational, emotional need for expression.

    • May 29, 2012 8:04 PM BST
    • I recently got a copy of this eBook written by Harvard-educated psychiatrist Richard Novic, a memoir about being a transvestite.  I found it a good read, very illuminating. The book is written very honestly and shows Richard Novic being truthful about his life choices both positive and negative.

       

      I'm not sure I agreed with some of the more manipulative tricks he used but I can see, to a lesser extent, how we all can sometimes play these headgames.

       

      There's a lot of ask for one thing and promise that's the extent of it, then push a bit further, (because it's not a massive step to take) promise again that this is the extent of it, then push a bit further, (because, again it's not a massive step further than where we are at the moment) and promise again that this will be the extent of it, repeat until we get exactly what we always wanted in the first place or, at worst, the ability to say "well she allowed me to do this, she must have known where it would lead"  and claim the high ground against her seeming pettiness.

       

      There's a brutal honesty to his self analysis that makes the book worthwhile and I would definitely recommend

       

    • November 6, 2013 3:45 PM GMT
    • God bless.

    • October 30, 2013 5:13 PM GMT
    • That was quite a read Christine and shows just how awful the trans community can be, and I know quite a few of us here can point to occasions when we have been turned upon, simply because of having a different opinion on a particular matter. 

      The trans community paints itself as being downtrodden and victimised and it's true, it has not been an easy ride for us, but I have personally seen how back stabbing it can also be. Bizarrely, all of the incidents I have been involved in were from post op women with an almost 'holier than thou' attitude! 

       

      It's good to see something like this posted and demonstrates how unbiased you yourself are Chrissie. 

       

      I would love to see other people's thoughts on the matter. 

       

    • October 30, 2013 12:50 PM GMT
    • In 2003, psychology professor and sex researcher J. Michael Bailey published a book entitled The Man Who Would Be Queen: The Science of Gender-Bending and Transsexualism. The book’s portrayal of male-to-female (MTF) transsexualism, based on a theory developed by sexologist Ray Blanchard, outraged some transgender activists. They believed the book to be typical of much of the biomedical literature on transsexuality—oppressive in both tone and claims, insulting to their senses of self, and damaging to their public identities. Some saw the book as especially dangerous because it claimed to be based on rigorous science, was published by an imprint of the National Academy of Sciences, and argued that MTF sex changes are motivated primarily by erotic interests and not by the problem of having the gender identity common to one sex in the body of the other. Dissatisfied with the option of merely criticizing the book, a small number of transwomen (particularly Lynn Conway, Andrea James, and Deirdre McCloskey) worked to try to ruin Bailey. Using published and unpublished sources as well as original interviews, this essay traces the history of the backlash against Bailey and his book. It also provides a thorough exegesis of the book’s treatment of transsexuality and includes a comprehensive investigation of the merit of the charges made against Bailey that he had behaved unethically, immorally, and illegally in the production of his book. The essay closes with an epilogue that explores what has happened since 2003 to the central ideas and major players in the controversy.

       

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3170124/    Read on

    • October 22, 2013 4:33 PM BST
    • Gender is simply a social construction, it is a model of behaving and appearing a certain way depending upon one's biology. It is perpertrated by society who have an idea of what they percieve as 'normal' for male/female. It is also only relevant to a certain time and place, i.e., different societies have differing views on gender norms, and even the Western viewpoint changes with time as can be seen in the last century with it becoming acceptable for women to wear clothing seen as traditionally male, something that would not have been tolerated at the beginning of the 20th century. Likewise with women in employment, being given the vote, holding public office etc. The list is exhaustive. 

       

      Women challenged the norms of society and were able to instigate changes, not often popular ones, which has led to them being on an equal footing with men. It speaks volumes about their resilience and fortitude and is a lesson that we can all learn. 

       

    • October 22, 2013 1:08 AM BST
    • The beginnings of life had no genders. We all are a product of genderless beginnings. :) Interesting analysis Mahi

    • October 21, 2013 7:20 PM BST
    • I got to add entirely different perspective to the matter. May be time has come for us to accept the new truths.(ref. MAN IS THE EXTENSION OF WOMAN). Its an universal equation it can not be denied.But look at the man. He is something more.  He is X and Y.  That means, he is essentially an ‘X ’plus something extra. What do I mean by that! Man is already a woman that is ‘X’, plus something extra.  Does that mean first step towards manhood is womanhood? Now let’s talk in mathematical language. Here is the equation,   Man = 22 autosomes + X + Y Woman= 22 autosomes + X + X= 22 autsomes + X (by logic not by mathematics). . .  Man= (22 autosomes + X) + Y= Woman + Y (by mathematics, simply) So man is everything that woman is, plus something extra.  Now the extra thing is not qualitatively different, but quantitatively. Hence Y here must be somewhat like X + 1, X+2 or X+ 3 or something like that. It would be ultimately proven that woman can potentially grow into man. Similarly man can reduce to woman, if he loses some part of ‘Y’.

    • July 12, 2013 7:14 PM BST
    • I've been reading several books by Katie Leon.  Her writing style is wonderful, and she does a wonderful job of capturing the heart and soul of the transsexual experience.  Some that I have read recently include:

       

      Summertime Pinks

      Just Friends

      The Dress Punishment

      The Wishing Blanket

       

      I'm just starting Wrestling Against Myself, but haven't read enough to make a recommendation yet.

       

      Some other favorites:

       

      Confessions of a Transsexual Physician by Jessica Birch

       

      A Girl's Life by David Michaels

       

      Undercover Girl: Growing up Transgender by Jill Davidson

       

      Squirrel Cage by Cindi Jones

       

      Becoming Emma by Sandy Thomas

       

      Emma by Tanya Allen

       

      The Hard Way by Tanya Allen

       

       

      Some other favorite Authors include:

       

      Tanya Allan - stories of transsexuals - transitioning - often early.

       

      Sarah Desmarais - Sissy Cuckholding themes - older men, transformed by their wives or mother-in-law

       

      Sandy Thomas - Men reluctantly turned into women - often under duress (hiding from gangsters, helping a friend,...) and discovering that they love being women.  Good reading, especially if you are in your 20s or early 30s.  A bit painful to consider if you are in your 50s or older.

       

      Bea - Forced cross-dressing and feminization - "Sissy" stories.  This is a common fantasy for many transsexuals, myself included, because we have had so many people in our lives trying to force us to be men, which we hate being.  The prospect of having someone who knows what they are doing pushing us through the process of transition, breaking through all the pain, terror, and intimitadation - decades of programming - can be very liberating.

       

      I'm an Amazon Kindle customer, and when I started reading these books, I quickly found a number of recommendations and similar books that were also enjoyable.  These are a good start.  I now have the Kindle App on my Cell phone, tablet, and laptop.

       

    • January 16, 2012 5:23 AM GMT
    • Luna by Julie Anne Peters is a very good fictional TG book. It's about a young adult who is TS and beginning to transition as told from the point of view of her younger sister. It's geared at young adults so don't expect a huge vocabulary but the overall themes and messages definitely make it a worthwhile read.

    • September 30, 2012 9:18 AM BST
    • Hi,
      I've just been reading a book which my son brought back from his holiday in the USA. It's called called, 'The Discovery of Jeanne Baret' by Glynnis Ridley, published in paperback by Broadway Books in 2011. Baret was a French woman who, between 1767 and 1775, became the first woman to circumnavigate the world. She went as assistant to her lover and associate, Commerson, who was the botanist on the voyage and, because women were banned from going on French ships, she undertook much of the voyage crossdressed as a man.
      Her true status came to light in Tahiti in 1768 when she was read by some natives. It seems that the reason for this was because, as in many traditional cultures gender variance was commonplace and actually seen as a positive thing to do and someone doing this was known as 'Mahu'. As Ridley puts it, 'Young men wishing to dress and behave as women would, after puberty, be integrated into the households of married women (other than their mothers) where they would assist with tasks typically undertaken by women, such as the care of children and care of children.' p. 167.
      From this, and other accounts of traditional and ancient cultures I've read about, gender variance has been known about, accepted and often celebrated since time began. The question for me then is, what are the forces in our culture which have led to the imposition of a binary gender model?

       

      The book is a fascinating account of Baret's life who overcame the barriers imposed by her gender and social class. I am full of admiration for her and in my opinion her story deserves to be more widely known.
      Best wishes,
      Nell x

    • July 24, 2012 2:03 PM BST
    • "My Husband Betty" was one of the first books I shared with my spouse, but only after Peggy Rudd's "My Husband Wears My Clothes" broke the ice.

      I read through both first, and I though Helen's book was a bit more harsh, a bit more likely to just raise more questions, rather than put her at ease.

    • April 27, 2012 3:07 PM BST
    • I just borrowed Helen's first book, "My Husband Betty" from the library, and I've just read the Introduction and first Chapter. She's basically trying to 'tell it like it is' for her and Betty, so we'll see the good and the bad sides. I spotted this book after doing another search of the library's catalog, and plan on reading Helen's second book next.
      In the library's preview of this book, it seems that Helen's greatest fear, already expressed in the beginning of her first book, that Betty might want to 'go all the way' to becoming a woman is coming true.

    • February 27, 2012 10:50 PM GMT
    • I'm enjoying She's Not There (A Life in Two Genders) by Jennifer Finney Boylan.

    • February 26, 2012 8:19 PM GMT
    • Hello everyone.

      I would like to start this forum because I have had a hard time finding literature that deals with the crossdressing; transgender; transexual issues. Of course after endless searches and money not so well spent, I have got to find books that address it from sociological and non-critical objective approaches (rather than medical or therapeutic). In my case before picking a book I usually read the comments and impressions (printed on Amazon) from other people who have bought the book but after a while, most texts (despite beautifully written) begin to be repetitive and do not offer new information. I have also found that because of the nature of the subject other books derive terrible language that distorts and/or destroys the savable content of it. Others are fictional and what I attempt with this forum, is to have other people to write about their impressions and comments on books that are informative in several regards; like new approaches and perspectives of what been a trans person means, feels and how it is identified (aside from self diagnosed). I will begin writing my own comments, impressions and a general description on books that I have read on future postings; and will also write about the reasons why I find them to be worth reading.

      I would like this to be an objective forum and as a sign of respect to publishers and authors, negative comments or impressions on books should not be included but instead make this work a source of information on books that we believe should be on everyone’s shelves.

      I have two final comments: some of the ideas written in this presentation letter, as well as some of the comments I will make on books, might (or will) lack an adequate writing technique; I am not a native English speaker, which helps to an inadequate language or distorted ideas. Finally I would like to add that I am not, nor have I ever worked as an editor; all I wish is a source of information and an objective approach for all those who seek a better understanding of this subject from one of their own.

      Best wishes and regards

      Robin