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  • 20 Oct 2015
    I am sitting here in panties, yoga pants, and a cute little blue t-shirt top with cropped arms and sailboats emblazoned across the front. Not the sexiest outfit in the world, but I’m not looking for sex. Just doing laundry and cooking some dinner. Like any other woman in the world. Whether we admit it or not, how we dress can be an important component to our identities as transwomen. And, how transwomen dress is the subject of so many stereotypes and cliches that folks are often disturbed to find out that most of us dress like plain ol’ regular everyday women. Sure, those stereotypes and cliches do exist, and that is okay. There is room enough for all of us in this gargantuan tent known as gender identity. However, there is a point for many of us at which the clothing choices cease to have any bearing on our gender identity. (I’ve changed clothes, by the way. Unflattering pajama pants and a sports team t-shirt. Dinner is done, the dishes are washed. Laundry is still going.) When I was five-years-old, I slipped on a pair of my mom’s flats and walked into the living where where she and my dad sat watching television with my little brother. I looked up at my mom, and said, “I want to be a girl.” Her response was to ask me why. I told her, “Because they get to wear all the good clothes.” At five-years-old, clothes represented everything I knew about girls. Everything. I had no idea about their genitalia, and it being sooooo many years prior to the Internet, I had no way of find out. Girls wore pretty clothes. They jumped rope. They told secrets to each other. Girls were pretty. I really wanted to be a pretty girl. Fast forward about forty years or so. I am working in Saudi Arabia, where transgenderism can get you thrown in prison and awarded a multitude of lashes to be meted out in public. I had no girl clothes. Life hadn’t gone the way I planned, and I never became the woman I wanted to be. I fell in love and was working to ensure life went well for others. But, my female identity didn’t disappear. In fact, if anything, it strengthened because I realized that being female was who I was. As a person. Clothes didn’t matter. Breasts didn’t matter. Genitalia didn’t matter. I was - I am - a woman. Clothes are, and always will be, an important part of the transgender community. We all love to get gussied up and go out. For some, the clothes are the thing. For others, the facade is the thing. For still others, they’re simply clothes.
    2394 Posted by Jessi Grace
  • I am sitting here in panties, yoga pants, and a cute little blue t-shirt top with cropped arms and sailboats emblazoned across the front. Not the sexiest outfit in the world, but I’m not looking for sex. Just doing laundry and cooking some dinner. Like any other woman in the world. Whether we admit it or not, how we dress can be an important component to our identities as transwomen. And, how transwomen dress is the subject of so many stereotypes and cliches that folks are often disturbed to find out that most of us dress like plain ol’ regular everyday women. Sure, those stereotypes and cliches do exist, and that is okay. There is room enough for all of us in this gargantuan tent known as gender identity. However, there is a point for many of us at which the clothing choices cease to have any bearing on our gender identity. (I’ve changed clothes, by the way. Unflattering pajama pants and a sports team t-shirt. Dinner is done, the dishes are washed. Laundry is still going.) When I was five-years-old, I slipped on a pair of my mom’s flats and walked into the living where where she and my dad sat watching television with my little brother. I looked up at my mom, and said, “I want to be a girl.” Her response was to ask me why. I told her, “Because they get to wear all the good clothes.” At five-years-old, clothes represented everything I knew about girls. Everything. I had no idea about their genitalia, and it being sooooo many years prior to the Internet, I had no way of find out. Girls wore pretty clothes. They jumped rope. They told secrets to each other. Girls were pretty. I really wanted to be a pretty girl. Fast forward about forty years or so. I am working in Saudi Arabia, where transgenderism can get you thrown in prison and awarded a multitude of lashes to be meted out in public. I had no girl clothes. Life hadn’t gone the way I planned, and I never became the woman I wanted to be. I fell in love and was working to ensure life went well for others. But, my female identity didn’t disappear. In fact, if anything, it strengthened because I realized that being female was who I was. As a person. Clothes didn’t matter. Breasts didn’t matter. Genitalia didn’t matter. I was - I am - a woman. Clothes are, and always will be, an important part of the transgender community. We all love to get gussied up and go out. For some, the clothes are the thing. For others, the facade is the thing. For still others, they’re simply clothes.
    Oct 20, 2015 2394
  • 05 Oct 2016
    Where I ever concocted the naive and simplistic idea that those Trans people who end up attracted to the opposite and their birth sex must be Bisexual, I have no idea. I married again, after the death of my first wife; and, the relationship was as good as it gets until my obligation to Transition clicked in.   One of the other two girls on our South Coast break, a fortnight ago, became sufficiently unwell to be considered for hospital admission from Casualty. We arrived with her 'things' and plans regarding disposal of her car her car.   In Casualty, we were allowed in behind the curtains to sit and to talk with her. Swiftly shood out by the nurse, prior to the return of the doctor with her blood results; we stood in the corridor as a god-like adonis passed by. Open-mouthed we both simply swooned. The nurses called us back in: she was to be discharged, with a prescription, as the blood tests were satisfactory, she informed us.   Her next remark concerned her 'falling in love with the doctor': you should have seen him, she stated! We informed her that we both had done so, and we were also in love. Her reply: "I saw him first, so he's mine!'   After nearly two years on hormones, I have started to notice attractive men: I would have put money on that "Never, ever happening" to me.
  • Where I ever concocted the naive and simplistic idea that those Trans people who end up attracted to the opposite and their birth sex must be Bisexual, I have no idea. I married again, after the death of my first wife; and, the relationship was as good as it gets until my obligation to Transition clicked in.   One of the other two girls on our South Coast break, a fortnight ago, became sufficiently unwell to be considered for hospital admission from Casualty. We arrived with her 'things' and plans regarding disposal of her car her car.   In Casualty, we were allowed in behind the curtains to sit and to talk with her. Swiftly shood out by the nurse, prior to the return of the doctor with her blood results; we stood in the corridor as a god-like adonis passed by. Open-mouthed we both simply swooned. The nurses called us back in: she was to be discharged, with a prescription, as the blood tests were satisfactory, she informed us.   Her next remark concerned her 'falling in love with the doctor': you should have seen him, she stated! We informed her that we both had done so, and we were also in love. Her reply: "I saw him first, so he's mine!'   After nearly two years on hormones, I have started to notice attractive men: I would have put money on that "Never, ever happening" to me.
    Oct 05, 2016 2384
  • 18 Mar 2012
    Hey all, I'm afraid I've got some bad news, actually bad doesn't even begin to describe it, its down right awful. As many of you may know I am at the begining steps of my transition and so far things have moved along fairly well, until now. My parents do not like the idea at all and as I am still dependent on them their opinion of me means everything at this point. My parents have decided that I should no longer have anything to do with the trans community because they think it has influenced my decision making and has clouded my judgement of who and what I am. This means no going out, dressing in private, support groups, and what I consider probably the most painful no more GS. While it breaks my heart and I am crying while writing this I have decided to accept their challenge if only to prove to them that this is who I really am even without all of the clothes and friends I am still and always will be a girl if only on the inside at this point. As such many of you may not hear from me again for a few months, I just wanted all of you to know that I was ok and that I will be back, hopefully this will be sooner rather than later, I love you all and you have been an instrumental part of my life that helped and supported me through some very dark times but I have to do this if not just too prove that this is real to my family and maybe even to myself. You are all wonderful people and this is a wonderful site and I am counting down the days until I can come back to it, feel free to email me at masibranch@yahoo.com if there is anything important you need to tell me but otherwise I will not be accessing any other ways of communication for a while. So with that I must say goodbye for now, hopefully when I come back I'll be a better person and a better woman because of it. Forever and always, Masi xxxxxxxxxxx
    2291 Posted by Maci Branch
  • Hey all, I'm afraid I've got some bad news, actually bad doesn't even begin to describe it, its down right awful. As many of you may know I am at the begining steps of my transition and so far things have moved along fairly well, until now. My parents do not like the idea at all and as I am still dependent on them their opinion of me means everything at this point. My parents have decided that I should no longer have anything to do with the trans community because they think it has influenced my decision making and has clouded my judgement of who and what I am. This means no going out, dressing in private, support groups, and what I consider probably the most painful no more GS. While it breaks my heart and I am crying while writing this I have decided to accept their challenge if only to prove to them that this is who I really am even without all of the clothes and friends I am still and always will be a girl if only on the inside at this point. As such many of you may not hear from me again for a few months, I just wanted all of you to know that I was ok and that I will be back, hopefully this will be sooner rather than later, I love you all and you have been an instrumental part of my life that helped and supported me through some very dark times but I have to do this if not just too prove that this is real to my family and maybe even to myself. You are all wonderful people and this is a wonderful site and I am counting down the days until I can come back to it, feel free to email me at masibranch@yahoo.com if there is anything important you need to tell me but otherwise I will not be accessing any other ways of communication for a while. So with that I must say goodbye for now, hopefully when I come back I'll be a better person and a better woman because of it. Forever and always, Masi xxxxxxxxxxx
    Mar 18, 2012 2291
  • 10 Apr 2011
    And so dear reader, the "Soft Launch" continues.  We had hoped that we could have a big new site launch party in a blaze of publicity this weekend but alas, it was not to be. The trouble is down to the membership subscription system which appears to be suffering from various teething problems and refuses to allow some members to upgrade or it will upgrade them and then lock them out of the site.  Even the administrator (ie me) can't re-enable their accounts. So, we have to wait for the developers to come back into work tomorrow in the hope that they can fix it. I am at least pleased that we have managed to move on quite a lot in the last week and that the site is now live after months of work.  The initial problems on launch were fixed within about 24 hours and the page load times have improved greatly with an average load time currently of just under 5 seconds.  I think that's pretty good.  Even Facebook would be happy about that kind of speed. Once we get this last big hurdle out of the way (the membership probs) we should be good to go. And thanks for your support during this difficult but exciting time. Hugs, Katie   x
    2246 Posted by Katie Glover
  • And so dear reader, the "Soft Launch" continues.  We had hoped that we could have a big new site launch party in a blaze of publicity this weekend but alas, it was not to be. The trouble is down to the membership subscription system which appears to be suffering from various teething problems and refuses to allow some members to upgrade or it will upgrade them and then lock them out of the site.  Even the administrator (ie me) can't re-enable their accounts. So, we have to wait for the developers to come back into work tomorrow in the hope that they can fix it. I am at least pleased that we have managed to move on quite a lot in the last week and that the site is now live after months of work.  The initial problems on launch were fixed within about 24 hours and the page load times have improved greatly with an average load time currently of just under 5 seconds.  I think that's pretty good.  Even Facebook would be happy about that kind of speed. Once we get this last big hurdle out of the way (the membership probs) we should be good to go. And thanks for your support during this difficult but exciting time. Hugs, Katie   x
    Apr 10, 2011 2246
  • 21 Sep 2014
    omg!!!!   a friend came round this afternoon, and asked if i wanted to go to the beach. she said she fancied one not far from me, a quiet little bay. sounded like a great idea, so i got some things together and off we went.   i packed my swimming costume, and a cotton dress to wear over the top, not really thinking i was going to use them, but hey, at least id have the option. as it happens, i did. i actually went swimming in my new swimming costume!!! i didnt bother with the dress, it felt amazing!!   im so so happy. i cant wait for work tomorrow. i had a lovely message from one of the drivers today, telling me not to worry, everyone there is really ok with it all, and that they admire me for following the path that i have to follow. i think i must be the happiest girl ever right now :)
    2226 Posted by Stephie Hughes
  • omg!!!!   a friend came round this afternoon, and asked if i wanted to go to the beach. she said she fancied one not far from me, a quiet little bay. sounded like a great idea, so i got some things together and off we went.   i packed my swimming costume, and a cotton dress to wear over the top, not really thinking i was going to use them, but hey, at least id have the option. as it happens, i did. i actually went swimming in my new swimming costume!!! i didnt bother with the dress, it felt amazing!!   im so so happy. i cant wait for work tomorrow. i had a lovely message from one of the drivers today, telling me not to worry, everyone there is really ok with it all, and that they admire me for following the path that i have to follow. i think i must be the happiest girl ever right now :)
    Sep 21, 2014 2226
  • 01 Aug 2012
    Truthfully I can say that being transgendered isn't an easy path.  There is so much fear that has crippled me over the years.  Denial has also played a huge factor in my life as well.  I don't want to be a transsexual woman or any other type of gender variant individual.  Yes I said that because if things had worked out like they should have I would have been born as a girl and that would be the end of the story.  Living a life in fear of being discovered isn't for me.  I don't want to hide anymore and I want to be honest to others about who I really am and how I feel.  That doesn't mean I will tell everyone and wave my little TG flag around because I believe in discretion as well.  What I suppose it means for myself is I have finally come to accept myself as being a transgendered person.  This has been a very long time coming but I can really say I am OK with it.  The tricky part is where do I go from here?   If we live long enough I suppose we can all get here.  Years of frustration and anger and self loathing, praying, bargaining, fighting, wondering... I am still here and so are my gender issues.  I am in my forties facing the prospect of transitioning.  For those of you who are younger please listen to what your inner voice tells you about yourself.  Get counseling and help early.  You deserve it and owe it to yourself to be honest about your feelings.  Find somebody to talk to now don't wait until tomorrow even.  If you are a girl who feels she should be a boy then don't ignore those feelings.  If you are a guy who is ashamed that he dresses in women's clothing you need to find out why you are doing these things.  If you are saddened by the fact that you have a penis and won't grow breasts like other girls you need help.  Don't try to suffer through or be a false martyr because you will regret it later.  If you are transgendered you need support from people who can accept that about you and can help you to make YOUR OWN decisions about what you can do about it.  Don't blame anyone else for your situation face it and deal with it and own it.    Hi I'm Karen a 44 year old transgendered person.  I am a human being and I am learning to be better to myself.  Don't ever stop trying, do what you can.  Love yourself even if you think you don't deserve it.  Be kind and finally smile.  Yes you reader smile until you feel it inside.  You can't change the world or other people but you can change your mind.  You can change you.     Karen
    2201 Posted by Karen Moore
  • Truthfully I can say that being transgendered isn't an easy path.  There is so much fear that has crippled me over the years.  Denial has also played a huge factor in my life as well.  I don't want to be a transsexual woman or any other type of gender variant individual.  Yes I said that because if things had worked out like they should have I would have been born as a girl and that would be the end of the story.  Living a life in fear of being discovered isn't for me.  I don't want to hide anymore and I want to be honest to others about who I really am and how I feel.  That doesn't mean I will tell everyone and wave my little TG flag around because I believe in discretion as well.  What I suppose it means for myself is I have finally come to accept myself as being a transgendered person.  This has been a very long time coming but I can really say I am OK with it.  The tricky part is where do I go from here?   If we live long enough I suppose we can all get here.  Years of frustration and anger and self loathing, praying, bargaining, fighting, wondering... I am still here and so are my gender issues.  I am in my forties facing the prospect of transitioning.  For those of you who are younger please listen to what your inner voice tells you about yourself.  Get counseling and help early.  You deserve it and owe it to yourself to be honest about your feelings.  Find somebody to talk to now don't wait until tomorrow even.  If you are a girl who feels she should be a boy then don't ignore those feelings.  If you are a guy who is ashamed that he dresses in women's clothing you need to find out why you are doing these things.  If you are saddened by the fact that you have a penis and won't grow breasts like other girls you need help.  Don't try to suffer through or be a false martyr because you will regret it later.  If you are transgendered you need support from people who can accept that about you and can help you to make YOUR OWN decisions about what you can do about it.  Don't blame anyone else for your situation face it and deal with it and own it.    Hi I'm Karen a 44 year old transgendered person.  I am a human being and I am learning to be better to myself.  Don't ever stop trying, do what you can.  Love yourself even if you think you don't deserve it.  Be kind and finally smile.  Yes you reader smile until you feel it inside.  You can't change the world or other people but you can change your mind.  You can change you.     Karen
    Aug 01, 2012 2201
  • 22 Mar 2011
    I sometimes wonder why I bother at all.  Every time I've said we are just a day or two away from making this site live, I have been scuppered by one huge problem or another.   It seemed like we were all set to go a few weeks back and I told everyone to say goodbye to the old site once and for all.  Then we discovered a huge problem in the membership system which would not allow anyone to log in unless they had a valid subscription.   I protested to the developers and said that the vast majority of our members are on our free membership level and we can't force them to start subscriptions.  I was told I would have to create a new subscription for $0.00 and get the programmers to automatically assign all Basic members to it, just so they could log in.   That job is still ongoing as I speak.  And so, it is now almost April and we are still on the starting blocks.  You have no idea how upset I am about this and about the sheer amount of time it's taken to get this far.   Many times over the last few months, I have thought seriously about just walking away from this altogether instead of throwing good money after bad - money we just can't afford.   Maybe I should just concentrate on Frock Magazine and leave it at that.  Perhaps that's what the gods want me to do.   Or maybe I should just give up altogether and get a job on the bins.   Glum Katie   :(
    2160 Posted by Katie Glover
  • I sometimes wonder why I bother at all.  Every time I've said we are just a day or two away from making this site live, I have been scuppered by one huge problem or another.   It seemed like we were all set to go a few weeks back and I told everyone to say goodbye to the old site once and for all.  Then we discovered a huge problem in the membership system which would not allow anyone to log in unless they had a valid subscription.   I protested to the developers and said that the vast majority of our members are on our free membership level and we can't force them to start subscriptions.  I was told I would have to create a new subscription for $0.00 and get the programmers to automatically assign all Basic members to it, just so they could log in.   That job is still ongoing as I speak.  And so, it is now almost April and we are still on the starting blocks.  You have no idea how upset I am about this and about the sheer amount of time it's taken to get this far.   Many times over the last few months, I have thought seriously about just walking away from this altogether instead of throwing good money after bad - money we just can't afford.   Maybe I should just concentrate on Frock Magazine and leave it at that.  Perhaps that's what the gods want me to do.   Or maybe I should just give up altogether and get a job on the bins.   Glum Katie   :(
    Mar 22, 2011 2160
  • 06 May 2011
    As I sit here this morning I feel a bit down that I can't be me. I'm supposed to meet some people for breakfast this morning & have to do it in male mode, which sucks. I finely got my nailpolish on right, not a dab out of place & an awsome color. But it has to come off. The reality is that I can never really go out as Karen. All the clothes & makeup on earth couldn't make me look right. After all the operations I had in 06 I have a huge gut with a scar as big as the palm of my hand right in the middle of it. Evan with out that at 52 it seems to late to start. If I would have had internet 30yrs ago I would have not felt so alone & so afraid to be the girl I want so badly to be.  I'm still alone. The net & being here at GS is not a real substitute for real friends.  Don't get me wrong I've met some real great ladies here. But my laptop can't hold a hand or wipe a tear. So I'll just keep feeling sad & go on with life as it is.
    2151 Posted by Karen Brad
  • As I sit here this morning I feel a bit down that I can't be me. I'm supposed to meet some people for breakfast this morning & have to do it in male mode, which sucks. I finely got my nailpolish on right, not a dab out of place & an awsome color. But it has to come off. The reality is that I can never really go out as Karen. All the clothes & makeup on earth couldn't make me look right. After all the operations I had in 06 I have a huge gut with a scar as big as the palm of my hand right in the middle of it. Evan with out that at 52 it seems to late to start. If I would have had internet 30yrs ago I would have not felt so alone & so afraid to be the girl I want so badly to be.  I'm still alone. The net & being here at GS is not a real substitute for real friends.  Don't get me wrong I've met some real great ladies here. But my laptop can't hold a hand or wipe a tear. So I'll just keep feeling sad & go on with life as it is.
    May 06, 2011 2151
  • 25 Mar 2013
    Hi All,   So sorry this has been over a year in the writing, but the next stage of my story is here.   As I have explained in my earlier blogs, Mrs T and I hit a bit of an armageddon a few months back when I thought it was all over as I simply couldn't ignore Kati any longer. 13 years of a very happy marriage was great for both of us, but the suppression was slowly killing me. We talked stiltedly and decided that we ought to have a proper evening where we talked about the whole issue properly. This resulted in a massive awakening for both of us, and it turned out that a; I wasn't going to spring a transition onto my wife, and b; she wasn't really too bothered about my dressing.   Moving on a year, we are still not terribly comfortable talking about my alternative personality, but I do press the issue and we do talk rationally about it.   We recently went to a hotel where we talked long and openly about it, ending in me showing Mrs T a picture of me as Kati (although wearing an old discarded dress of hers, and not, as I had planned, wearing clothes that were nothing to do with our relationship.) This seemed to go very well, and we ended the evening intimately with both of us wearing some amount of clothing normally assigned to women. The next few days, however, were difficult and ended in Mrs T getting quite emotional and me realising that we had gone way too far way too fast. My desire to be me totally, overtook our desire to be a normal couple.   For now, we have taken a step back, but I am hopeful for the future.   With extra small steps, using Mrs T as a guide, we will get to somewhere where we are both happy and accepting. It is difficult for me, as I have seen the light at the end of the tunnel, but it is also difficult for Mrs T as she wants the tunnel not to end. In fact, she would prefer there were no tunnel to begin with, but is dealing with the fact that she will be in it for the forseeable future. I wish the tunnel were never even built and that both ends flowed seamlessly into each other.   It's a difficult time, but I know I am blessed with a loving wife who really does want to understand better. I am doing everything I can to help her, but must always remember that pushing her forward will only make us move backwards.   Tough old life, but I wouldn't change it for the world. Lots of love and hugs to you all.   Kati xxx
    2149 Posted by Kati Davies
  • Hi All,   So sorry this has been over a year in the writing, but the next stage of my story is here.   As I have explained in my earlier blogs, Mrs T and I hit a bit of an armageddon a few months back when I thought it was all over as I simply couldn't ignore Kati any longer. 13 years of a very happy marriage was great for both of us, but the suppression was slowly killing me. We talked stiltedly and decided that we ought to have a proper evening where we talked about the whole issue properly. This resulted in a massive awakening for both of us, and it turned out that a; I wasn't going to spring a transition onto my wife, and b; she wasn't really too bothered about my dressing.   Moving on a year, we are still not terribly comfortable talking about my alternative personality, but I do press the issue and we do talk rationally about it.   We recently went to a hotel where we talked long and openly about it, ending in me showing Mrs T a picture of me as Kati (although wearing an old discarded dress of hers, and not, as I had planned, wearing clothes that were nothing to do with our relationship.) This seemed to go very well, and we ended the evening intimately with both of us wearing some amount of clothing normally assigned to women. The next few days, however, were difficult and ended in Mrs T getting quite emotional and me realising that we had gone way too far way too fast. My desire to be me totally, overtook our desire to be a normal couple.   For now, we have taken a step back, but I am hopeful for the future.   With extra small steps, using Mrs T as a guide, we will get to somewhere where we are both happy and accepting. It is difficult for me, as I have seen the light at the end of the tunnel, but it is also difficult for Mrs T as she wants the tunnel not to end. In fact, she would prefer there were no tunnel to begin with, but is dealing with the fact that she will be in it for the forseeable future. I wish the tunnel were never even built and that both ends flowed seamlessly into each other.   It's a difficult time, but I know I am blessed with a loving wife who really does want to understand better. I am doing everything I can to help her, but must always remember that pushing her forward will only make us move backwards.   Tough old life, but I wouldn't change it for the world. Lots of love and hugs to you all.   Kati xxx
    Mar 25, 2013 2149
  • 30 May 2011
    Filed By Kelley Winters, PhD  http://www.bilerico.com/contributors/kelley_winters/May 28, 2011 10:00 AM | 28 comments  http://www.bilerico.com/2011/05/transvestic_disorder_the_overlooked_anti-trans_dia_1.php#commentsOn May 5, the American Psychiatric Association released a second round of proposed diagnostic criteria for the 5th Edition of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). These include two categories that impact the trans community: Gender Dysphoria (formerly Gender Identity Disorder) and Transvestic Disorder (formerly Transvestic Fetishism).While GID has received a great deal of attention in the press and from GLBTQ advocates, the second transvestic category is too often overlooked. This is unfortunate, because a diagnosis of Transvestic Disorder is designed to punish social and sexual gender nonconformity and to enforce binary stereotypes of assigned birth sex. It plays no role in enabling access to medical transition care for those who need it, and it is frequently cited when care is denied.http://www.gidreform.org/blog2010Oct15.htmlI urge all trans community members, friends, care providers, and allies to call for the removal of this punitive and scientifically unfounded diagnosis from the DSM-5. The current period for public comment to the APA ends June 15.The entry in the current DSM on Transvestic Disorder, like the former entry on Transvestic Fetishism, is authored by Dr. Ray Blanchard of the Toronto Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (formerly known as the Clarke Institute). Blanchard has drawn outrage from the transcommunity for his defamatory theory of autogynephilia, http://www.gidreform.org/blog2008Nov10.htmlasserting that all transsexual women who are not exclusively attracted to males are motivated to transition by self-obsessed sexual fetishism. He is canonizing this harmful stereotype of transsexual women in the DSM-5 by adding an autogynephilia specifier to the Transvestic Disorder diagnosis.http://www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevision/Pages/proposedrevision.aspx?rid=189#Worse yet, Blanchard has broadly expanded the diagnosis to implicate gender-nonconforming people of all sexes and all sexual orientations, even inventing an autoandrophilia specifier to smear transsexual men. Most recently, he has added an "In Remission" specifier to preclude the possibility of exit from diagnosis. Like a roach motel, there may be no way out of the Transvestic Disorder diagnosis once ensnared.What You Can Do Now1. Go to the http://www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevision/Pages/proposedrevision.aspx?rid=189#APA DSM-5 website, click on "Register Now," create a user account, and enter your statement in the box. The deadline for this second period of public comment is June 15.[NOTE: Safari may not load that web page.  Use Firefox or another Browser instead]2. Sign the Petition to Remove Transvestic Disorder from the DSM-5, sponsored by the International Foundation for Gender Education.http://dsm.ifge.org/petition/3. Demand that your local, national, and international GLBTQ nonprofit organizations issue public statements calling for the removal of this defamatory Transvestic Disorder category from the DSM-5. So far, very few have.4. Spread the word to your networks, friends, and allies.http://www.gidreform.org/blog2010Oct15.html for More InformationCross-posted with additional comments at the http://gidreform.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/transvestic-disorder-the-overlooked-anti-trans-diagnosis-in-the-dsm-5/GID Reform Advocates Blog.
    2147 Posted by Traci Lee O'Gara
  • Filed By Kelley Winters, PhD  http://www.bilerico.com/contributors/kelley_winters/May 28, 2011 10:00 AM | 28 comments  http://www.bilerico.com/2011/05/transvestic_disorder_the_overlooked_anti-trans_dia_1.php#commentsOn May 5, the American Psychiatric Association released a second round of proposed diagnostic criteria for the 5th Edition of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). These include two categories that impact the trans community: Gender Dysphoria (formerly Gender Identity Disorder) and Transvestic Disorder (formerly Transvestic Fetishism).While GID has received a great deal of attention in the press and from GLBTQ advocates, the second transvestic category is too often overlooked. This is unfortunate, because a diagnosis of Transvestic Disorder is designed to punish social and sexual gender nonconformity and to enforce binary stereotypes of assigned birth sex. It plays no role in enabling access to medical transition care for those who need it, and it is frequently cited when care is denied.http://www.gidreform.org/blog2010Oct15.htmlI urge all trans community members, friends, care providers, and allies to call for the removal of this punitive and scientifically unfounded diagnosis from the DSM-5. The current period for public comment to the APA ends June 15.The entry in the current DSM on Transvestic Disorder, like the former entry on Transvestic Fetishism, is authored by Dr. Ray Blanchard of the Toronto Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (formerly known as the Clarke Institute). Blanchard has drawn outrage from the transcommunity for his defamatory theory of autogynephilia, http://www.gidreform.org/blog2008Nov10.htmlasserting that all transsexual women who are not exclusively attracted to males are motivated to transition by self-obsessed sexual fetishism. He is canonizing this harmful stereotype of transsexual women in the DSM-5 by adding an autogynephilia specifier to the Transvestic Disorder diagnosis.http://www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevision/Pages/proposedrevision.aspx?rid=189#Worse yet, Blanchard has broadly expanded the diagnosis to implicate gender-nonconforming people of all sexes and all sexual orientations, even inventing an autoandrophilia specifier to smear transsexual men. Most recently, he has added an "In Remission" specifier to preclude the possibility of exit from diagnosis. Like a roach motel, there may be no way out of the Transvestic Disorder diagnosis once ensnared.What You Can Do Now1. Go to the http://www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevision/Pages/proposedrevision.aspx?rid=189#APA DSM-5 website, click on "Register Now," create a user account, and enter your statement in the box. The deadline for this second period of public comment is June 15.[NOTE: Safari may not load that web page.  Use Firefox or another Browser instead]2. Sign the Petition to Remove Transvestic Disorder from the DSM-5, sponsored by the International Foundation for Gender Education.http://dsm.ifge.org/petition/3. Demand that your local, national, and international GLBTQ nonprofit organizations issue public statements calling for the removal of this defamatory Transvestic Disorder category from the DSM-5. So far, very few have.4. Spread the word to your networks, friends, and allies.http://www.gidreform.org/blog2010Oct15.html for More InformationCross-posted with additional comments at the http://gidreform.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/transvestic-disorder-the-overlooked-anti-trans-diagnosis-in-the-dsm-5/GID Reform Advocates Blog.
    May 30, 2011 2147