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  • 28 Sep 2009
      Today is my second birthday, rebirthday of course. 2 years of being happy with my new body, which is no longer new, it’s just, my body. I gave myself a bit of a rebirthday present by flying to Germany last week to see my favourite musician of the last 25 years or so, Andreas Vollenweider. What a super trip. The flight from Manchester to Bremen was a doddle, found a cheap taxi company for transfer to the cheap hotel in Oldenburg, which was amazingly smart, and included a fantastic buffet breakfast, and a fridge on each landing with free bottled drinks - water, soft drinks, and beeeeer. Amazingly good value, and I took good advantage of the all you can eat breakfast, and the all you can drink fridges. Also had a good shop in Oldenburg, found a sexy skirt and a snazzy, chic cardie/top. But the gig, the reason I was there, was astounding, Wondrous, beautiful music, played by extremely talented musicians, especially Andreas himself. Having loved his music for so long, but only ever seen still photo’s of him, to actually see him play was amazing. The man is an absolute genius, a master of the many instruments he can play. His "electro-acoustic modified pedal harp" has just the most gorgeous sound. To hear it on big speakers in a concert hall, and to see his skill and deftness as his hands glide gracefully over the strings was a joy, nothing short of heavenly. Words cannot describe how good it was to see him, I’m still reeling, still buzzing. It was amazing. A real treat. I am so happy, so inspired, and so filled with awe. Wow. Here's an old clip on youtube, for anyone who's interested in furthering their musical tastes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XOdKG9Z_Xw&NR=1 xx
    2008 Posted by Lucy Diamond
  •   Today is my second birthday, rebirthday of course. 2 years of being happy with my new body, which is no longer new, it’s just, my body. I gave myself a bit of a rebirthday present by flying to Germany last week to see my favourite musician of the last 25 years or so, Andreas Vollenweider. What a super trip. The flight from Manchester to Bremen was a doddle, found a cheap taxi company for transfer to the cheap hotel in Oldenburg, which was amazingly smart, and included a fantastic buffet breakfast, and a fridge on each landing with free bottled drinks - water, soft drinks, and beeeeer. Amazingly good value, and I took good advantage of the all you can eat breakfast, and the all you can drink fridges. Also had a good shop in Oldenburg, found a sexy skirt and a snazzy, chic cardie/top. But the gig, the reason I was there, was astounding, Wondrous, beautiful music, played by extremely talented musicians, especially Andreas himself. Having loved his music for so long, but only ever seen still photo’s of him, to actually see him play was amazing. The man is an absolute genius, a master of the many instruments he can play. His "electro-acoustic modified pedal harp" has just the most gorgeous sound. To hear it on big speakers in a concert hall, and to see his skill and deftness as his hands glide gracefully over the strings was a joy, nothing short of heavenly. Words cannot describe how good it was to see him, I’m still reeling, still buzzing. It was amazing. A real treat. I am so happy, so inspired, and so filled with awe. Wow. Here's an old clip on youtube, for anyone who's interested in furthering their musical tastes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XOdKG9Z_Xw&NR=1 xx
    Sep 28, 2009 2008
  • 23 Aug 2011
    When I woke up today and went down the stairs I noticed the kettle was on. I looked inside and it only had enough water for one cup, so naturally I filled it so there was enough for 2. My housemate promptly burst into outrage with objection. I said that I only filled it sufficiently for 2 cups and she replied that she hasnt got all day to wait for the kettle to boil. I replied that that this is the reason we cant live together and I am so happy she is moving out today! YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY!   I have never met anyone so selfish, self centred and inconsiderate in all my life.
    1987 Posted by Penny Zenny
  • When I woke up today and went down the stairs I noticed the kettle was on. I looked inside and it only had enough water for one cup, so naturally I filled it so there was enough for 2. My housemate promptly burst into outrage with objection. I said that I only filled it sufficiently for 2 cups and she replied that she hasnt got all day to wait for the kettle to boil. I replied that that this is the reason we cant live together and I am so happy she is moving out today! YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY!   I have never met anyone so selfish, self centred and inconsiderate in all my life.
    Aug 23, 2011 1987
  • 19 Aug 2011
    I've been thinking back to my dressing when I was very young. I think the first thing I ever wore was a pair of tights, & I got caught by everybody. I didn't get in trouble but I was told not to do that again. The thing is I don't remember how old I was. But it stayed with me, I wanted to dress & look like a girl so bad.  I didn't know anything about how a girl really dressed. My mom & dad both worked so if I stayed home from school I was alone in the house.  I'd go into my sisters room & just look at her clothes. I was to scared to try anything on. At First. She had some skirt sets, matching skirt & vest or jacket. I'd never seen her wear them. When I did finely start to dress I was so suprised that they fit me so well, since my sister was 5yrs older than me. Turns out they were to small for her anymore. There were 5 or 6 different sets & I put them on as often as I could. Then one day they were gone, she got rid of them. I only just found out that she threw them out so I'd stop wearing them. She knew because I hung them back up wrong. I think that's why on Holloween she'd help me dress up in panties & everything every year.
    1960 Posted by Karen Brad
  • I've been thinking back to my dressing when I was very young. I think the first thing I ever wore was a pair of tights, & I got caught by everybody. I didn't get in trouble but I was told not to do that again. The thing is I don't remember how old I was. But it stayed with me, I wanted to dress & look like a girl so bad.  I didn't know anything about how a girl really dressed. My mom & dad both worked so if I stayed home from school I was alone in the house.  I'd go into my sisters room & just look at her clothes. I was to scared to try anything on. At First. She had some skirt sets, matching skirt & vest or jacket. I'd never seen her wear them. When I did finely start to dress I was so suprised that they fit me so well, since my sister was 5yrs older than me. Turns out they were to small for her anymore. There were 5 or 6 different sets & I put them on as often as I could. Then one day they were gone, she got rid of them. I only just found out that she threw them out so I'd stop wearing them. She knew because I hung them back up wrong. I think that's why on Holloween she'd help me dress up in panties & everything every year.
    Aug 19, 2011 1960
  • 28 Aug 2013
    Someone sent this to Lee today, I thought it was cute.........and oh so accurate LOL YOU KNOW YOU'RE FROM ARIZONA WHEN. . . 1. You can say Hohokam and no one thinks you're making it up. 2.You no longer associate rivers or bridges with water. 3.You know that a "swamp cooler" is not a happy hour drink. 4.You can contemplate a high temperature of 120 degrees as "not all that bad, after all it's a dry heat." 5.You know that you can make sun tea outside faster than instant tea in your microwave. 6.You have to run your air conditioner in the middle of winter so that you can use your fireplace. 7.The water coming from the "cold" tap is hotter than that from the hot" tap. 8.You can correctly pronounce the following words: "Saguaro", "Tempe", "Gila Bend", "San Xavier del Bac", "Canyon de Chelly", "Mogollon Rim", "Cholla", and "Tlaquepacque", "Ajo". 9.It's noon on a weekday in July, kids are on summer vacation, and not one single person is moving on the streets. 10.Hot air balloons can't fly because the air outside is hotter than the air inside. 11.You buy salsa by the gallon. 12.Your Christmas decorations include a half a yard of sand and 100 paper bags. 13.You think someone driving while wearing oven mitts is clever. 14.Most of the restaurants in your town have the first name "El" or "Los." 15.You think six tons of crushed rock makes a beautiful yard. 16.You can say 115 degrees without fainting. 17.Vehicles with open windows have the right-of-way in the summer. 18.People break out coats when the temperature drops below 70. 19.You discover, in July, it only takes two fingers to drive your car. 20.The pool can be warmer than you are. 21.You realize Valley Fever isn't a disco dance. 22.People with black cars or have black upholstery in their car are automatically assumed to be from out-of-state or nuts. 23.You know better than to get into a car/truck with leather seats if you're wearing shorts. 24.Announcements for Fourth of July events always end with "in case of monsoon..." 25.You have to explain to out-of-staters why there is no daylight savings time 26.You can say "haboob" without giggling.
    1956 Posted by Briana Lynn Rekowski
  • Someone sent this to Lee today, I thought it was cute.........and oh so accurate LOL YOU KNOW YOU'RE FROM ARIZONA WHEN. . . 1. You can say Hohokam and no one thinks you're making it up. 2.You no longer associate rivers or bridges with water. 3.You know that a "swamp cooler" is not a happy hour drink. 4.You can contemplate a high temperature of 120 degrees as "not all that bad, after all it's a dry heat." 5.You know that you can make sun tea outside faster than instant tea in your microwave. 6.You have to run your air conditioner in the middle of winter so that you can use your fireplace. 7.The water coming from the "cold" tap is hotter than that from the hot" tap. 8.You can correctly pronounce the following words: "Saguaro", "Tempe", "Gila Bend", "San Xavier del Bac", "Canyon de Chelly", "Mogollon Rim", "Cholla", and "Tlaquepacque", "Ajo". 9.It's noon on a weekday in July, kids are on summer vacation, and not one single person is moving on the streets. 10.Hot air balloons can't fly because the air outside is hotter than the air inside. 11.You buy salsa by the gallon. 12.Your Christmas decorations include a half a yard of sand and 100 paper bags. 13.You think someone driving while wearing oven mitts is clever. 14.Most of the restaurants in your town have the first name "El" or "Los." 15.You think six tons of crushed rock makes a beautiful yard. 16.You can say 115 degrees without fainting. 17.Vehicles with open windows have the right-of-way in the summer. 18.People break out coats when the temperature drops below 70. 19.You discover, in July, it only takes two fingers to drive your car. 20.The pool can be warmer than you are. 21.You realize Valley Fever isn't a disco dance. 22.People with black cars or have black upholstery in their car are automatically assumed to be from out-of-state or nuts. 23.You know better than to get into a car/truck with leather seats if you're wearing shorts. 24.Announcements for Fourth of July events always end with "in case of monsoon..." 25.You have to explain to out-of-staters why there is no daylight savings time 26.You can say "haboob" without giggling.
    Aug 28, 2013 1956
  • 04 Jul 2011
    "So ya, thought ya, might like to go to the show, To feel the warm thrill of confusion, that space cadet glow..." And so it was this week that I had the privilege of feeling the warm thrill of confusion, seeing Roger Waters perform "The Wall" live at the M.E.N. Arena. By way of Catharsis I feel I must write a little about it. It was the most amazing show I have ever seen, and I have seen a few. I can't quite get over it... Words cannot express the spectacle of it, the musicianship, the design, the sheer brilliance, but I have to say something. I'd like to go through the whole show in detail, but that's not going to work, so I may pick some random bits. I'm hoping that some readers at least will know a little of the album - The Wall. It's about a rockstar named Pink... The show began with a brief flash-forward. Two Nazi-esque post-apocalyptic-nightmare soldiers marched onstage carrying a soft toy version of Pink in his stripped bare state as caricatured in the trial sequence from the animated footage of the film. A pencil outline of a strange childlike figure, emotionless and vulnerable. The soundtrack to the old film "Spartacus" boomed out as Pink's head was manipulated as though through his broken-down haze he examined the audience as if we were the ones chanting, "I'm Spartacus". The rabble reached its climax, stopped dead, and Pink was unceremoniously dropped to the floor. The soldiers marched off. And then without warning in a sudden flash, all hell was let loose... The opening bars to The Wall are thumping drums, screaming guitars and organ, playing a slow, grandiose rock piece. The drums did not thump here though, they thundered, they beat at your diaphram, they made the earth move. Banks of red maroons shot across the stage highlighting the first beat of each phrase, each double-hit of the impossibly deep drum sound. The maroons were SO bright it was surreal, lighting the whole auditorium in incandescent crimson. Giant white Roman candles fizzing across the top and bottom of the stage came at the end of the song, dazzling, almost blinding. All the pyrotechnics accompanied the stomping opening bars perfectly and stunningly. OK, now you have my attention, this is exciting, this sounds amazing, this is what I call Rock and Roll. The sound quality throughout was immaculate. I say this as a former sound-engineer, indeed I still mix the sound for our band from onstage whilst playing keyboards, singing backing vocals, and trying to look pretty. I digress... It was loud, excitingly so, but the clarity of sound was perfect. Attention to detail in every respect. Waters' vocal sat atop the mix majestically, clear and warm. He sang everything just as he did on the album, bringing a familiarity that you don't always get in a live show, but the whole sound was just, better. He's not the greatest vocalist in the world, but his voice has a certain character; his ability to wail desolately, or scream the lyrics manically is unique and brilliant within itself. I've never been his biggest fan, always preferring the musicality of Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, but I always appreciated the song-writing partnership they had, which to me stands alongside the genius of Lennon and McCartney. I think it's safe to say, I am now a fan of Roger Waters. He is a visionary. What he created 30 years ago and has once more brought back to life and revitalised was, and is, pure genius. The album was played through in its entirety true to the original format, some extended songs and solos, some brand-new brief additions here and there, no major re-working of any songs though. I've heard clips of older live performances of The Wall and it's obvious that this time Waters wanted to get back to how it was originally intended. This was wise in my opinion; it's what audiences want to hear. This was The Wall as it was supposed to be, the same arrangements but with attitude, and with one hell of a show to go with it. Snowy White was on second guitar, quite a surprise. The main guitarist, Dave Kilminster, played the big Gilmour solos note perfectly and with feeling. He blew me away, I have never heard anyone take off Gilmour so brilliantly. His playing was truly wonderful, it was a joy to behold and he certainly looked like he was getting into it. Over the course of the show, giant "puppets" appeared, as big as a house. Again these were based on the grotesque characters drawn by Gerald Scarfe for the album artwork and film; the teacher, Mother, and later the scary wife with her praying mantis arms, and lips that freakishly didn't meet at one side. At the end of the first song a plane flew from the back of the hall over the audience's heads, bursting into flames as it crashed through the wall, which at the start of the show had been built at the sides only. A follow spot hovered out from the main lighting rig above the stage and passed right above our seats, accompanied by massive helicopter noise. "YOU, yes YOU, stand still Laddie!" And then of course there was the inflatable flying pig daubed with slogans such as "Drink Kalashnikov Vodka", floating around the entire auditorium just over our heads. And all throughout the first half of the show, they gradually built a bloody great wall in front of the band... "Goodbye cruel world, I'm leaving you today... Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye!" The final brick was added on the last note of the first set. The first song of the second set had no visuals. There was no band to be seen, they played from behind the wall; Waters' controversial way of making his point. All we could see was a giant, stone-textured wall. "Hey you, standing in the aisles with itchy feet and fading smiles can you feel me..?" This was strangely unnerving. The stage was lit but we couldn't see it, the follow spot faded up during the vocals, the lights shone down behind the wall. How long are we going to just see a very big wall, we wondered. Not for long... Apart from the music, the sound quality, the gigantic puppetry, the effects, and various objects flying around the arena, what really made the show different, what made it a stunning and thought-provoking visual experience, were the projections onto the wall. They were there in the first half, but with the wall now complete (and bloody massive), we saw the projections in all their glory. Not just the animations that had been used in the film, but, well, too much really to even attempt to describe. There was a strong anti-war message running throughout. It was stark, brutal, and factually up to date including hundreds of photos of real people accompanied by their name, rank or occupation and born/died dates, all who'd been killed in conflicts from the first world war through to 9/11 and beyond. It was moving, and so cleverly done... As each brick was individually added to the wall we noticed that after a second or two the new brick would light up. The entire projection area had been broken down into blocks matching the position of each physical brick in the giant wall, so that each one could be lit or projected upon independently. This innovative idea was used to such clever effect in many different ways. At one point every brick on the wall was projected with a different photo of someone lost through conflict. We became aware that occasional bricks began to "fly" backwards, leaving a black hole in the wall as the photo-brick floated away into the vastness of space. More and more bricks faded away backwards, and for final emphasis when about half the bricks randomly remained, each still showing their individual projection, they twisted and floated away together into distant space; hundreds of real people fading away. You had to be there for the impact, it was devastating. Later in the show, individual bricks appeared to explode out from the wall and hurtle forwards into the audience, each brick projection getting larger and spinning towards us. An amazing, seemingly 3D effect, all done by projection onto a very large wall. The projections - weird, wonderful, beautiful, bizarre, and it being Roger Waters, usually anarchic, were omnipresent, barely giving us time to catch our breath as the next mind-bending idea was projected across the width and height of the stadium. And all this set to the massive, "theatrical" music of The Wall. Stunning. After the first song in the second set, the "surrogate band" appeared and took up their places in front of the wall. All were wearing the pseudo Nazi style uniforms, with hammer-logo armbands instead of swastikas, black berets instead of helmets, guitars their weapons of choice. Waters returned wearing the same outfit minus beret, and at first with a long black leather coat, eyeing the band up and down as if performing a military inspection as he walked across the stage; Gestapo meets twisted, delusional rockstar, oh but it was fun. Even when he shot me with his machine gun that flashed from the barrel as he fired, and panned across the speakers as he strafed the audience. And yes he did shoot me! You know when people think the singer is looking into their eyes and is singing just to them? Well he really was shooting right at me! I cowered in my seat, raising my arms in defence, I hope he appreciated me playing along... In the first song, Waters had exclaimed with glee, just as on the album, "Lights! And all the sound effects!" Searchlights flying overhead and picking us out was spooky, but the sound effects were verging on scary! Not content with the giant stack of speakers on either side, many of the sound effects came from another pair, the same size, at the back of the room. Helicopters panned around the 4 speakers, surrounding us with their sound. Guns, bombs, and weird and wonderful noises boomed out from behind. Such volume and clarity, like some immense, rock and roll, sound and light extravaganza, fairground ride. Nearing the end the music built towards its climax of mayhem, the Nazi rally chant, "Jawohl" emphasised the beat as it marched through the stadium. Battle noises, screeches, the final wall collapse and other huge sound effects rattled your body, you felt it right through you. It was awesome, I grinned throughout, it was hard to resist laughing manically. It was frightening and feel-good all at once. This was the warm thrill of confusion; an assault on the senses, safe but terrifying, insane but wonderful. Earth shattering, mind-blowing, beautifully done. xx   Roger's entrance: Goodbye Blue Sky Photos on the wall Mother, should I trust the government? Big wall, nearly built Those bricks are coming right at us! Slightly blurry, but we were there
    1953 Posted by Lucy Diamond
  • "So ya, thought ya, might like to go to the show, To feel the warm thrill of confusion, that space cadet glow..." And so it was this week that I had the privilege of feeling the warm thrill of confusion, seeing Roger Waters perform "The Wall" live at the M.E.N. Arena. By way of Catharsis I feel I must write a little about it. It was the most amazing show I have ever seen, and I have seen a few. I can't quite get over it... Words cannot express the spectacle of it, the musicianship, the design, the sheer brilliance, but I have to say something. I'd like to go through the whole show in detail, but that's not going to work, so I may pick some random bits. I'm hoping that some readers at least will know a little of the album - The Wall. It's about a rockstar named Pink... The show began with a brief flash-forward. Two Nazi-esque post-apocalyptic-nightmare soldiers marched onstage carrying a soft toy version of Pink in his stripped bare state as caricatured in the trial sequence from the animated footage of the film. A pencil outline of a strange childlike figure, emotionless and vulnerable. The soundtrack to the old film "Spartacus" boomed out as Pink's head was manipulated as though through his broken-down haze he examined the audience as if we were the ones chanting, "I'm Spartacus". The rabble reached its climax, stopped dead, and Pink was unceremoniously dropped to the floor. The soldiers marched off. And then without warning in a sudden flash, all hell was let loose... The opening bars to The Wall are thumping drums, screaming guitars and organ, playing a slow, grandiose rock piece. The drums did not thump here though, they thundered, they beat at your diaphram, they made the earth move. Banks of red maroons shot across the stage highlighting the first beat of each phrase, each double-hit of the impossibly deep drum sound. The maroons were SO bright it was surreal, lighting the whole auditorium in incandescent crimson. Giant white Roman candles fizzing across the top and bottom of the stage came at the end of the song, dazzling, almost blinding. All the pyrotechnics accompanied the stomping opening bars perfectly and stunningly. OK, now you have my attention, this is exciting, this sounds amazing, this is what I call Rock and Roll. The sound quality throughout was immaculate. I say this as a former sound-engineer, indeed I still mix the sound for our band from onstage whilst playing keyboards, singing backing vocals, and trying to look pretty. I digress... It was loud, excitingly so, but the clarity of sound was perfect. Attention to detail in every respect. Waters' vocal sat atop the mix majestically, clear and warm. He sang everything just as he did on the album, bringing a familiarity that you don't always get in a live show, but the whole sound was just, better. He's not the greatest vocalist in the world, but his voice has a certain character; his ability to wail desolately, or scream the lyrics manically is unique and brilliant within itself. I've never been his biggest fan, always preferring the musicality of Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, but I always appreciated the song-writing partnership they had, which to me stands alongside the genius of Lennon and McCartney. I think it's safe to say, I am now a fan of Roger Waters. He is a visionary. What he created 30 years ago and has once more brought back to life and revitalised was, and is, pure genius. The album was played through in its entirety true to the original format, some extended songs and solos, some brand-new brief additions here and there, no major re-working of any songs though. I've heard clips of older live performances of The Wall and it's obvious that this time Waters wanted to get back to how it was originally intended. This was wise in my opinion; it's what audiences want to hear. This was The Wall as it was supposed to be, the same arrangements but with attitude, and with one hell of a show to go with it. Snowy White was on second guitar, quite a surprise. The main guitarist, Dave Kilminster, played the big Gilmour solos note perfectly and with feeling. He blew me away, I have never heard anyone take off Gilmour so brilliantly. His playing was truly wonderful, it was a joy to behold and he certainly looked like he was getting into it. Over the course of the show, giant "puppets" appeared, as big as a house. Again these were based on the grotesque characters drawn by Gerald Scarfe for the album artwork and film; the teacher, Mother, and later the scary wife with her praying mantis arms, and lips that freakishly didn't meet at one side. At the end of the first song a plane flew from the back of the hall over the audience's heads, bursting into flames as it crashed through the wall, which at the start of the show had been built at the sides only. A follow spot hovered out from the main lighting rig above the stage and passed right above our seats, accompanied by massive helicopter noise. "YOU, yes YOU, stand still Laddie!" And then of course there was the inflatable flying pig daubed with slogans such as "Drink Kalashnikov Vodka", floating around the entire auditorium just over our heads. And all throughout the first half of the show, they gradually built a bloody great wall in front of the band... "Goodbye cruel world, I'm leaving you today... Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye!" The final brick was added on the last note of the first set. The first song of the second set had no visuals. There was no band to be seen, they played from behind the wall; Waters' controversial way of making his point. All we could see was a giant, stone-textured wall. "Hey you, standing in the aisles with itchy feet and fading smiles can you feel me..?" This was strangely unnerving. The stage was lit but we couldn't see it, the follow spot faded up during the vocals, the lights shone down behind the wall. How long are we going to just see a very big wall, we wondered. Not for long... Apart from the music, the sound quality, the gigantic puppetry, the effects, and various objects flying around the arena, what really made the show different, what made it a stunning and thought-provoking visual experience, were the projections onto the wall. They were there in the first half, but with the wall now complete (and bloody massive), we saw the projections in all their glory. Not just the animations that had been used in the film, but, well, too much really to even attempt to describe. There was a strong anti-war message running throughout. It was stark, brutal, and factually up to date including hundreds of photos of real people accompanied by their name, rank or occupation and born/died dates, all who'd been killed in conflicts from the first world war through to 9/11 and beyond. It was moving, and so cleverly done... As each brick was individually added to the wall we noticed that after a second or two the new brick would light up. The entire projection area had been broken down into blocks matching the position of each physical brick in the giant wall, so that each one could be lit or projected upon independently. This innovative idea was used to such clever effect in many different ways. At one point every brick on the wall was projected with a different photo of someone lost through conflict. We became aware that occasional bricks began to "fly" backwards, leaving a black hole in the wall as the photo-brick floated away into the vastness of space. More and more bricks faded away backwards, and for final emphasis when about half the bricks randomly remained, each still showing their individual projection, they twisted and floated away together into distant space; hundreds of real people fading away. You had to be there for the impact, it was devastating. Later in the show, individual bricks appeared to explode out from the wall and hurtle forwards into the audience, each brick projection getting larger and spinning towards us. An amazing, seemingly 3D effect, all done by projection onto a very large wall. The projections - weird, wonderful, beautiful, bizarre, and it being Roger Waters, usually anarchic, were omnipresent, barely giving us time to catch our breath as the next mind-bending idea was projected across the width and height of the stadium. And all this set to the massive, "theatrical" music of The Wall. Stunning. After the first song in the second set, the "surrogate band" appeared and took up their places in front of the wall. All were wearing the pseudo Nazi style uniforms, with hammer-logo armbands instead of swastikas, black berets instead of helmets, guitars their weapons of choice. Waters returned wearing the same outfit minus beret, and at first with a long black leather coat, eyeing the band up and down as if performing a military inspection as he walked across the stage; Gestapo meets twisted, delusional rockstar, oh but it was fun. Even when he shot me with his machine gun that flashed from the barrel as he fired, and panned across the speakers as he strafed the audience. And yes he did shoot me! You know when people think the singer is looking into their eyes and is singing just to them? Well he really was shooting right at me! I cowered in my seat, raising my arms in defence, I hope he appreciated me playing along... In the first song, Waters had exclaimed with glee, just as on the album, "Lights! And all the sound effects!" Searchlights flying overhead and picking us out was spooky, but the sound effects were verging on scary! Not content with the giant stack of speakers on either side, many of the sound effects came from another pair, the same size, at the back of the room. Helicopters panned around the 4 speakers, surrounding us with their sound. Guns, bombs, and weird and wonderful noises boomed out from behind. Such volume and clarity, like some immense, rock and roll, sound and light extravaganza, fairground ride. Nearing the end the music built towards its climax of mayhem, the Nazi rally chant, "Jawohl" emphasised the beat as it marched through the stadium. Battle noises, screeches, the final wall collapse and other huge sound effects rattled your body, you felt it right through you. It was awesome, I grinned throughout, it was hard to resist laughing manically. It was frightening and feel-good all at once. This was the warm thrill of confusion; an assault on the senses, safe but terrifying, insane but wonderful. Earth shattering, mind-blowing, beautifully done. xx   Roger's entrance: Goodbye Blue Sky Photos on the wall Mother, should I trust the government? Big wall, nearly built Those bricks are coming right at us! Slightly blurry, but we were there
    Jul 04, 2011 1953
  • 09 May 2011
    over the years,since youve been gone,I have lived,lived my life for you.but now no more.for you see I must go on with my life and live for me. And now I send my last tear drop to heaven,and now I write my last heart ache on a cloud.for you see I cant cry,no more tears left inside.But I will never forget you. I must go now.But your within my heart.I got to find myself again,for me.But just no I will never   forget you,no never.For you see your apart of me.   words and music by charlene lynn cook.music availble upon request.
    1950 Posted by charlene lynn cook
  • over the years,since youve been gone,I have lived,lived my life for you.but now no more.for you see I must go on with my life and live for me. And now I send my last tear drop to heaven,and now I write my last heart ache on a cloud.for you see I cant cry,no more tears left inside.But I will never forget you. I must go now.But your within my heart.I got to find myself again,for me.But just no I will never   forget you,no never.For you see your apart of me.   words and music by charlene lynn cook.music availble upon request.
    May 09, 2011 1950
  • 16 Sep 2011
    You may have noticed that we have recently done away with the dating site adverts which used to adorn our pages.  We've taken a bit of a chance because although they didn't really fit in with the image we are trying to portray, they did pay for themselves.  However, you said you didn't want dating ads so now they're gone.   We have replaced them with a small group of new advertisers, most of whom are advertising with us for the very first time.  Of course, I am very much aware that if they don't see good results, it may also be the last time they advertise with us.    So, I would ask you to help by supporting our new advertisers.  Click their ads and go and see their web sites and if you do buy from them, please remember to let them know that you found them at the Gender Society site.   Thanks and hugs, Katie   x
    1935 Posted by Katie Glover
  • You may have noticed that we have recently done away with the dating site adverts which used to adorn our pages.  We've taken a bit of a chance because although they didn't really fit in with the image we are trying to portray, they did pay for themselves.  However, you said you didn't want dating ads so now they're gone.   We have replaced them with a small group of new advertisers, most of whom are advertising with us for the very first time.  Of course, I am very much aware that if they don't see good results, it may also be the last time they advertise with us.    So, I would ask you to help by supporting our new advertisers.  Click their ads and go and see their web sites and if you do buy from them, please remember to let them know that you found them at the Gender Society site.   Thanks and hugs, Katie   x
    Sep 16, 2011 1935
  • 05 Oct 2011
    Have you noticed?  Our site has been getting slower and slower over the last few weeks so we took the decision to move to a bigger, better, faster server with more RAM.  The transfer took around ten minutes during which time the site was down but I did take the precaution of posting notices warning everyone there would be a ten minute outage, several hours before it actually took place.All sites like ours have to keep on top of their page load times and often a server upgrade is the only way forward.  Following the transfer, our page load times have improved dramatically (average page load time is now about 4 seconds and out http://gendersociety.com/invite page loads in 2.69 seconds).  That's blisteringly fast so I'm very pleased that we moved.  I am working hard to keep us ahead of the game.However, I was a bit upset to hear that a number of our members dissed me when they heard we would be moving.  For the user we were talking about a few minutes of downtime to make the site much more useable but apparently several people just said something like, "What, another server move?  We just had one in March. What a bunch of wazzocks!"So, sorry for the inconvenience but it was for the best.  We are extremely poor and cannot afford to make decisions like this lightly.  So when improvements like this are made, please be assured that they have been thought through and that they are for the best.Hugs, Katie   x
    1929 Posted by Katie Glover
  • Have you noticed?  Our site has been getting slower and slower over the last few weeks so we took the decision to move to a bigger, better, faster server with more RAM.  The transfer took around ten minutes during which time the site was down but I did take the precaution of posting notices warning everyone there would be a ten minute outage, several hours before it actually took place.All sites like ours have to keep on top of their page load times and often a server upgrade is the only way forward.  Following the transfer, our page load times have improved dramatically (average page load time is now about 4 seconds and out http://gendersociety.com/invite page loads in 2.69 seconds).  That's blisteringly fast so I'm very pleased that we moved.  I am working hard to keep us ahead of the game.However, I was a bit upset to hear that a number of our members dissed me when they heard we would be moving.  For the user we were talking about a few minutes of downtime to make the site much more useable but apparently several people just said something like, "What, another server move?  We just had one in March. What a bunch of wazzocks!"So, sorry for the inconvenience but it was for the best.  We are extremely poor and cannot afford to make decisions like this lightly.  So when improvements like this are made, please be assured that they have been thought through and that they are for the best.Hugs, Katie   x
    Oct 05, 2011 1929
  • 27 Mar 2010
    I finally managed to get myself back into swimming again after about two years. The reason? Well, mostly because the pool changed their opening times which meant I now have time to go for a swim after I have given guitar lessons, or been to the gym, which takes up five evenings a week between them. It did feel nice to be able to stretch out in the pool though, and of course the jacuzzi afterwards is always a good place to finish for the evening. Wonderful!Nikki
    1919 Posted by Nikki Hollm
  • I finally managed to get myself back into swimming again after about two years. The reason? Well, mostly because the pool changed their opening times which meant I now have time to go for a swim after I have given guitar lessons, or been to the gym, which takes up five evenings a week between them. It did feel nice to be able to stretch out in the pool though, and of course the jacuzzi afterwards is always a good place to finish for the evening. Wonderful!Nikki
    Mar 27, 2010 1919
  • 23 Feb 2010
    Skiing was terrific as usual, I really enjoy it even though I may not have as much grace and style as those who grew up with it. My daughter also did really well in her first ski school and came second in her slalom race held on the final day of her course. I'm so proud of her and she can't wait to go again. It's still a crazy week though, I got back from skiing on Sunday, only to fly to the UK for a meeting on Monday, then this weekend I am off hiking as well, no rest for the wicked!! Nikki
    1908 Posted by Nikki Hollm
  • Skiing was terrific as usual, I really enjoy it even though I may not have as much grace and style as those who grew up with it. My daughter also did really well in her first ski school and came second in her slalom race held on the final day of her course. I'm so proud of her and she can't wait to go again. It's still a crazy week though, I got back from skiing on Sunday, only to fly to the UK for a meeting on Monday, then this weekend I am off hiking as well, no rest for the wicked!! Nikki
    Feb 23, 2010 1908