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  • 09 Aug 2017
    I felt like writing being prompted by a couple of media offerings that unwittingly seemed to show where Transgender people are today. Firstly on U.K. Radio 4 yesterday evening I listened to David Sedaris doing one of his readings, you can see it on line http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/03/28/david-sedaris-shops-for-clothes-in-tokyo David Sedaris is openly Gay, and often mentions his Partner Hugh in the dialogues.Listening on the Radio,David Sedaris refers to Hugh milking the transitioning joke, with references to clothing and tracheal shaves.I felt disturbed to hear the radio audience laughing . Secondly, The Athletics World Championship,and the BBC coverage of the Women's 1500 metre Final specifically Studio discussion of Caster Semenyas participation.I found interesting the analysis from Paula Radcliffe that exposed how the majority can make a judgement to force the individual to fit the norm in order to be included. Both of the examples made me think that Our societies are still not making Transgender people feel included.There is a vast range of transgendered people ,not just one stereotype to make hasty rules around.Ending on a more positive note it does seem there is still some guaranteed media coverage.But personally I look forward to the day when being transgendered is within the normal human range of existence no opportunity.
    325 Posted by Donna V
  • By Donna V
    I felt like writing being prompted by a couple of media offerings that unwittingly seemed to show where Transgender people are today. Firstly on U.K. Radio 4 yesterday evening I listened to David Sedaris doing one of his readings, you can see it on line http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/03/28/david-sedaris-shops-for-clothes-in-tokyo David Sedaris is openly Gay, and often mentions his Partner Hugh in the dialogues.Listening on the Radio,David Sedaris refers to Hugh milking the transitioning joke, with references to clothing and tracheal shaves.I felt disturbed to hear the radio audience laughing . Secondly, The Athletics World Championship,and the BBC coverage of the Women's 1500 metre Final specifically Studio discussion of Caster Semenyas participation.I found interesting the analysis from Paula Radcliffe that exposed how the majority can make a judgement to force the individual to fit the norm in order to be included. Both of the examples made me think that Our societies are still not making Transgender people feel included.There is a vast range of transgendered people ,not just one stereotype to make hasty rules around.Ending on a more positive note it does seem there is still some guaranteed media coverage.But personally I look forward to the day when being transgendered is within the normal human range of existence no opportunity.
    Aug 09, 2017 325
  • 05 Aug 2017
    Hey, I am again dressed, nothing glamorous just ordinary clothes, but this is the third consequtive night. Nothing commonplace about this occurance, as it may not repeat itself for a while and so every moment should be a relaxed treasure. Sorry about last night's post. When I read through this morning the fuel (It was a meek Cabarnet Sauvignon) was evident and frankly during the day the headache that built up during the morning was a reminder enough of what I had typed. Not that I regret the content, but it did all spill out quite quickly didn't it, like an ultra-thin 5p shopping bag with too many contents, I feel I let rip and let it all go. No escaping no picking up the pieces and pretending it didn't, doesn't or may not happen after that.. Thank you to Traci (Dear Traci) for a lovely heartfelt comment in return. I stretch out my arms across the pond and hug for a brief moment.. I have wondered about changing my name. My pseudonym which I have become accustomed to, has an artificiality about it that rings more of a drag queen (no offence girls) and less of the woman that I have ackowledge I am. Helen Blackwell may sound like a District Nurse to some who may be familiar with BBC Drama's set in working-class middle England, but it is painfully bland, grounded and oh so honest. Hmmn, but perhaps Rachel it should remain for now. Drabness - the outward appearance at least will return tomorrow. Have a lovely weekend all. Rachel x  
    399 Posted by Rachel de Blanc
  • Hey, I am again dressed, nothing glamorous just ordinary clothes, but this is the third consequtive night. Nothing commonplace about this occurance, as it may not repeat itself for a while and so every moment should be a relaxed treasure. Sorry about last night's post. When I read through this morning the fuel (It was a meek Cabarnet Sauvignon) was evident and frankly during the day the headache that built up during the morning was a reminder enough of what I had typed. Not that I regret the content, but it did all spill out quite quickly didn't it, like an ultra-thin 5p shopping bag with too many contents, I feel I let rip and let it all go. No escaping no picking up the pieces and pretending it didn't, doesn't or may not happen after that.. Thank you to Traci (Dear Traci) for a lovely heartfelt comment in return. I stretch out my arms across the pond and hug for a brief moment.. I have wondered about changing my name. My pseudonym which I have become accustomed to, has an artificiality about it that rings more of a drag queen (no offence girls) and less of the woman that I have ackowledge I am. Helen Blackwell may sound like a District Nurse to some who may be familiar with BBC Drama's set in working-class middle England, but it is painfully bland, grounded and oh so honest. Hmmn, but perhaps Rachel it should remain for now. Drabness - the outward appearance at least will return tomorrow. Have a lovely weekend all. Rachel x  
    Aug 05, 2017 399
  • 04 Aug 2017
    Hi. Firstly, please don't be alarmed by what you are about to read. This is a passage and I will move on from it. Rachel is fine, indeed she feels affirmed, looks great and doesnt' want to go anywhere. Richard on the other hand (there, I've said it, a big bloomin step) is in a real state. He is emasculated, ripped apart and half the woman he could be because he's a faltering man who spends the majority of his time in a state of disregard and disillusionment. Rachel is the dominant partner, the life and the soul the pace the vibrant tick-tock, the dreamer the aspirational poet the confident confidant and the fashionable dare I say sexual being that possesses soul and life. Richard is charming but spent, lacking in self-confidence retreating into a reclusive haf life where he looks at his male peers doesn't understand them or wish to be like them and so falls behind in the chiff-chaff battering of the egotistical bluffing that dominates his working environment. Rachel can see through all of this because she thinks clearly. Her self-confidence enables her to determine a path through the day but this only charts a route towards a dreamland, a pertpetual state of support that is beyond reach and so this perceivable and yet unachieved state mocks, taunts and screws into her other half's day. Rachel it must be said, has drunk two thirds of a bottle of wine. She's not drunk and alarming as a result, but she is fluid, open expressive and communicative. She strapped up and tucked away, wearing new skinny jeans with bosoms that yearn to be real and borrowed perfume. Her wardrobe - which is growing and now resides in the loft - I have a stash, I have a stash, is contemporary and purchased in person. Her make-up is now her own and her composition is better formed, more articuate and understood than it has ever been.  She has taken photos (again!) but cannot launch them into the world because Gender Society's photo albums are not currently yielding and have turned their back. She has considered walking out into the night, a trip around the block for the first time, but dare not. Riots have happened here recently, so better not start another. Rachel / Richard needs help in truth. There are people here that I call friends and whose shoulders I would like to burst into tears upon. If you are capable of this support do let me know, I can travel for this. Rachel isn't a selfish b***h (although this reads otherwise, infact I know she's grateful, expressive forgiving and empathetic. Any help provided would be returned with earnest and heartfelt thanks. Rachel could become a friend for life, Richard too. If you are reading this and have yet to come out and broach the reality of who you really are, then I hope that this gives you the momentum to move forward and not be like this in the future. If you are reading this having come out, transitioned even, then I hope it provides you with a momentunm to reflect and to celebrate what you are now, how far you have travelled and what you now are not. I said at the beginning not to be alarmed. I am and we are but that it our challenge to deal with. I should copy this post and send it to my Gender Therapist with the headline, 'Transition Required, Bridging Hormones to commence ASAP.' I am a woman and like a moth I flutter lively in the artificial environment of the evening. By day I am flat, still and prone to easy disintegration. Thank you for reading, and oh do write a blog or too because it's easier than you think to find peace through a passage or two. Take care Rachel x  
    446 Posted by Rachel de Blanc
  • Hi. Firstly, please don't be alarmed by what you are about to read. This is a passage and I will move on from it. Rachel is fine, indeed she feels affirmed, looks great and doesnt' want to go anywhere. Richard on the other hand (there, I've said it, a big bloomin step) is in a real state. He is emasculated, ripped apart and half the woman he could be because he's a faltering man who spends the majority of his time in a state of disregard and disillusionment. Rachel is the dominant partner, the life and the soul the pace the vibrant tick-tock, the dreamer the aspirational poet the confident confidant and the fashionable dare I say sexual being that possesses soul and life. Richard is charming but spent, lacking in self-confidence retreating into a reclusive haf life where he looks at his male peers doesn't understand them or wish to be like them and so falls behind in the chiff-chaff battering of the egotistical bluffing that dominates his working environment. Rachel can see through all of this because she thinks clearly. Her self-confidence enables her to determine a path through the day but this only charts a route towards a dreamland, a pertpetual state of support that is beyond reach and so this perceivable and yet unachieved state mocks, taunts and screws into her other half's day. Rachel it must be said, has drunk two thirds of a bottle of wine. She's not drunk and alarming as a result, but she is fluid, open expressive and communicative. She strapped up and tucked away, wearing new skinny jeans with bosoms that yearn to be real and borrowed perfume. Her wardrobe - which is growing and now resides in the loft - I have a stash, I have a stash, is contemporary and purchased in person. Her make-up is now her own and her composition is better formed, more articuate and understood than it has ever been.  She has taken photos (again!) but cannot launch them into the world because Gender Society's photo albums are not currently yielding and have turned their back. She has considered walking out into the night, a trip around the block for the first time, but dare not. Riots have happened here recently, so better not start another. Rachel / Richard needs help in truth. There are people here that I call friends and whose shoulders I would like to burst into tears upon. If you are capable of this support do let me know, I can travel for this. Rachel isn't a selfish b***h (although this reads otherwise, infact I know she's grateful, expressive forgiving and empathetic. Any help provided would be returned with earnest and heartfelt thanks. Rachel could become a friend for life, Richard too. If you are reading this and have yet to come out and broach the reality of who you really are, then I hope that this gives you the momentum to move forward and not be like this in the future. If you are reading this having come out, transitioned even, then I hope it provides you with a momentunm to reflect and to celebrate what you are now, how far you have travelled and what you now are not. I said at the beginning not to be alarmed. I am and we are but that it our challenge to deal with. I should copy this post and send it to my Gender Therapist with the headline, 'Transition Required, Bridging Hormones to commence ASAP.' I am a woman and like a moth I flutter lively in the artificial environment of the evening. By day I am flat, still and prone to easy disintegration. Thank you for reading, and oh do write a blog or too because it's easier than you think to find peace through a passage or two. Take care Rachel x  
    Aug 04, 2017 446
  • 18 Jul 2017
    Been a while since I've blogged/ranted on here, but figure this is probably the best place to say this. I've been sort of halfway out for a while now meaning I've told my mom I'm transgender and cut my hair short, but I still can't tell my dad. For those who don't know, I come from a very religious (Baptist) family so getting a sex change is pretty much the worst sin I could possibly commit besides killing myself according to my parents and what I've been brought up to believe. (Not saying I agree that it's wrong). I keep trying to come out further and talk about taking T-shots, but whenever I do, my mom suddenly goes backwards and gets embarrassed by the whole idea. She says she's supportive and wouldn't disown me, but she has the hardest time calling me her son and won't let go that I once dated guys in middle school. (I've told her being gay and trans are not the same thing, but she still brings it up). I just can't help but wonder and worry how much worse my dad will be and a part of me, in all honesty, thinks if I were to never get the change and just "tough this out" he'd actually be proud of me for once in my life. I know, that sounds really dramatic, but I've been trying to get him to not look at me as a "disappointment" pretty much all my life and having Asperger's hasn't helped. For those who don't know, I am trying to self-publish and become an author. I plan on writing a story called Obsession and it's based on me and something that happened. I will also be talking about being transgender and how my relationship with my dad is/was in this story. The reason I bring this up - I worry if I don't take T-shots and get the change, the trans community and others who read my book won't see me as a serious transgender? Part of me wonders if I should wait till I'm old and my parents are gone to be completely honest... Not sure what I'm going to do, but any support or suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    357 Posted by Kris McKinley
  • Been a while since I've blogged/ranted on here, but figure this is probably the best place to say this. I've been sort of halfway out for a while now meaning I've told my mom I'm transgender and cut my hair short, but I still can't tell my dad. For those who don't know, I come from a very religious (Baptist) family so getting a sex change is pretty much the worst sin I could possibly commit besides killing myself according to my parents and what I've been brought up to believe. (Not saying I agree that it's wrong). I keep trying to come out further and talk about taking T-shots, but whenever I do, my mom suddenly goes backwards and gets embarrassed by the whole idea. She says she's supportive and wouldn't disown me, but she has the hardest time calling me her son and won't let go that I once dated guys in middle school. (I've told her being gay and trans are not the same thing, but she still brings it up). I just can't help but wonder and worry how much worse my dad will be and a part of me, in all honesty, thinks if I were to never get the change and just "tough this out" he'd actually be proud of me for once in my life. I know, that sounds really dramatic, but I've been trying to get him to not look at me as a "disappointment" pretty much all my life and having Asperger's hasn't helped. For those who don't know, I am trying to self-publish and become an author. I plan on writing a story called Obsession and it's based on me and something that happened. I will also be talking about being transgender and how my relationship with my dad is/was in this story. The reason I bring this up - I worry if I don't take T-shots and get the change, the trans community and others who read my book won't see me as a serious transgender? Part of me wonders if I should wait till I'm old and my parents are gone to be completely honest... Not sure what I'm going to do, but any support or suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    Jul 18, 2017 357
  • 16 Jun 2017
    In a weeks time I have my post op appointment ,it's been 2 months since my GRS.Overall it's been an ordeal as last month my elderly parents health deteriorated rapidly with my mother going into a nursing home,.I was thinking about them and their difficulties.At the same time during these 2 months, I experienced feelings of isolation,which are not uncommon during GRS recovery.These seem to be down to the simple fact that you are going through an experience and adjustment that other people cannot relate to .Additionally all the post op after care ,dilating etc, ...is an incredibly time consuming routine and at times quite draining.so you appear to be less than sociable and pre occupied.In my case for various reasons I have a lot of domestic chores to do,so It just seemed a battle to fit everything into the day.Anyway I am just taking a little timeout,before a stint in the garden and trying to complete a metalwork sculpture commission. I am looking forward to the post appointment,especially the train journey,as I will get a chance to rest ,probably falling asleep.
    417 Posted by Donna V
  • By Donna V
    In a weeks time I have my post op appointment ,it's been 2 months since my GRS.Overall it's been an ordeal as last month my elderly parents health deteriorated rapidly with my mother going into a nursing home,.I was thinking about them and their difficulties.At the same time during these 2 months, I experienced feelings of isolation,which are not uncommon during GRS recovery.These seem to be down to the simple fact that you are going through an experience and adjustment that other people cannot relate to .Additionally all the post op after care ,dilating etc, ...is an incredibly time consuming routine and at times quite draining.so you appear to be less than sociable and pre occupied.In my case for various reasons I have a lot of domestic chores to do,so It just seemed a battle to fit everything into the day.Anyway I am just taking a little timeout,before a stint in the garden and trying to complete a metalwork sculpture commission. I am looking forward to the post appointment,especially the train journey,as I will get a chance to rest ,probably falling asleep.
    Jun 16, 2017 417
  • 14 Jun 2017
    just wondering if anybody have heard of any voice impaired trans genders. doc told me if i was lucky i migght have some voice left after my cancer surgery of the thyroid, partual voice box and most of my neck and lymphnoids of  my throat be side all of this i lost most of the muscle that contect the right shouilder with my neck muscles. this all added up to a stage 3 cancer . as of right now why voice is hardly audiable to others in normal situations amplication is now being used at home and famlies , but the thing is at work wondering if i should learn ASL  caus e i work in a distirubtion center where  it is loud and noisey even with the amp i know that no one could hear me  if i was in case to get in trouble there at work so far bw side the operation in have gone 8 weeks of exterior radiation bombardment therapy. i hope i dont have to do chemo(fingures crossed) . any wat that is my blog for this season i hope    
    369 Posted by michelle/mitchell self
  • just wondering if anybody have heard of any voice impaired trans genders. doc told me if i was lucky i migght have some voice left after my cancer surgery of the thyroid, partual voice box and most of my neck and lymphnoids of  my throat be side all of this i lost most of the muscle that contect the right shouilder with my neck muscles. this all added up to a stage 3 cancer . as of right now why voice is hardly audiable to others in normal situations amplication is now being used at home and famlies , but the thing is at work wondering if i should learn ASL  caus e i work in a distirubtion center where  it is loud and noisey even with the amp i know that no one could hear me  if i was in case to get in trouble there at work so far bw side the operation in have gone 8 weeks of exterior radiation bombardment therapy. i hope i dont have to do chemo(fingures crossed) . any wat that is my blog for this season i hope    
    Jun 14, 2017 369
  • 01 Jun 2017
    Thought for today. Dressing; Elastoplast for the Soul. A little shopping, new sandals and a top. Genes happy. Rachel x
    390 Posted by Rachel de Blanc
  • Thought for today. Dressing; Elastoplast for the Soul. A little shopping, new sandals and a top. Genes happy. Rachel x
    Jun 01, 2017 390
  • 13 May 2017
    Hi. I am visiting my parents who are now distant from home and feel further away than ever as they age, but we are still close. As an opportunist and whilst they are out I do something that I haven't done for possibly thirty years, I look into my mother's wardobe.. Don't be alarmed, no Vera Batty moments (foreign users please excuse my regional references) because I was only on the hunt for one garment, that Sixties black dress that I first wore in the late seventies. I can remember the silk lining and its embroidered texture, it was quite a firm material, shaped and I recall the difficulties of doing up the rear zip and the effervescent tingling sensations running cursing through me as I was re-shaped, awoken and stimulated by the messages that it sent me. It was of course not there when I looked, but I suspect that it may still be stored away, in the attic in a musty box of memories. I think it was a special dress for my Mum, and I suspect that if she were aware that it were my first dress, then it would be even more important too. I also drove to my old school today. It was a little tired and of course smaller than I remembered - in the manner that everything shrinks as you accumulate a lifetime of experience. Moments spent there have flickered through my head throughout the day. I was a popular and having 'finished' with a girlfriend in lower sixth momentarily became a prospective 'catch' just when sexual opportunities were first upon the horizon. Ignorant and perhaps slightly bemused by the messages my brain was sending my hormones - and in no way as well informed as a contemporary web educated teenager is, I recall being asked by a prospective suitor, 'Are you Gay?'. Sensitive, artistic male souls were in short supply in sports mad South Wales at this time so my detachment from the marauding scrum must have marked me out as being different. 'No, I'm not!' I responded, before failing to confirm my sentence with the statement, 'But I want to be a girl'. Always there, never spoken.. Kids today are so fortunate to have the information that the twenty-first century makes available, because that means that their parents are also more informed too. Ultimately she caught me of course, my Mum; lipstick and make-up in the bathroom. If I were to tell her all now I suspect that she'd be the one caught out, but if that black dress were in the attic I'm also certain that she'd let me have it. Rachel x
    399 Posted by Rachel de Blanc
  • Hi. I am visiting my parents who are now distant from home and feel further away than ever as they age, but we are still close. As an opportunist and whilst they are out I do something that I haven't done for possibly thirty years, I look into my mother's wardobe.. Don't be alarmed, no Vera Batty moments (foreign users please excuse my regional references) because I was only on the hunt for one garment, that Sixties black dress that I first wore in the late seventies. I can remember the silk lining and its embroidered texture, it was quite a firm material, shaped and I recall the difficulties of doing up the rear zip and the effervescent tingling sensations running cursing through me as I was re-shaped, awoken and stimulated by the messages that it sent me. It was of course not there when I looked, but I suspect that it may still be stored away, in the attic in a musty box of memories. I think it was a special dress for my Mum, and I suspect that if she were aware that it were my first dress, then it would be even more important too. I also drove to my old school today. It was a little tired and of course smaller than I remembered - in the manner that everything shrinks as you accumulate a lifetime of experience. Moments spent there have flickered through my head throughout the day. I was a popular and having 'finished' with a girlfriend in lower sixth momentarily became a prospective 'catch' just when sexual opportunities were first upon the horizon. Ignorant and perhaps slightly bemused by the messages my brain was sending my hormones - and in no way as well informed as a contemporary web educated teenager is, I recall being asked by a prospective suitor, 'Are you Gay?'. Sensitive, artistic male souls were in short supply in sports mad South Wales at this time so my detachment from the marauding scrum must have marked me out as being different. 'No, I'm not!' I responded, before failing to confirm my sentence with the statement, 'But I want to be a girl'. Always there, never spoken.. Kids today are so fortunate to have the information that the twenty-first century makes available, because that means that their parents are also more informed too. Ultimately she caught me of course, my Mum; lipstick and make-up in the bathroom. If I were to tell her all now I suspect that she'd be the one caught out, but if that black dress were in the attic I'm also certain that she'd let me have it. Rachel x
    May 13, 2017 399
  • 11 May 2017
    Hi I haven't blogged for a while, so my apologies for that. I've voyeuristically visited her and take delight a seeing names of friends that I recognise and I look with absolute wonder as I see people journey from timidity and concern to open, confident realisation of their true self. That's lovely to behold. Remarkably my membership tells me that I am mid-way through my tenth year upon this site. I think I changed my description from Transvestite to Transexual after perhaps a year, but it was a much delayed written definition. So what on earth have I been playing at since, why I have failed to physical reconcile with my mind and spirit? Because I am a coward, oh, and because I am an 'honourable man'. There is no doubt that the veil of masculinity has slipped away, within my mind at least. My brain has disengaged with any attempt to be one of the boys and so I'm a peripheral male with an eye for all that is lady's. My son is upstairs asleep, my wife away and here I sit dressed, made-up and oh so content and at ease. Should the child upstairs awake then this will be a dream filled night for us both, one of us living the nightmare of exposure. I would commence upon Hormones tomorrow, now. My hair, recently cut doesn't currently require a wig to proclaim that gender of the head from which it sprouts. My breasts are false but the heart beneath connects to the mounds emphatically and pulls them close. I am thinking clearly, warmly, openly, positively and communicating with passion and freedom. I'm not thinking too much about what to type next, I'm watching the typos and this is where the stuttering takes hold. I'd like to be in a room, in a group now with Crissie, Katie, Lucy and friends knocking back a glass of wine perhaps and but in full release, with laughter hugs and undoubtably tears too. Next week I have enquired about attending a Transgender Support Group and should I attend this would be the first occasion where Rachel would introduce herself to a group, as a person rather than a online commodity. But will I go? 50:50 at the moment because I'm a coward upon the verge of a breakdown and an honorary man who has lost his masulinity and without which may be nobody. But that is wrong of course, because I'm a woman called Rachel. It's just that nobody knows and the isolation is slowly killing me. Warm Hugs Rachel x  
    382 Posted by Rachel de Blanc
  • Hi I haven't blogged for a while, so my apologies for that. I've voyeuristically visited her and take delight a seeing names of friends that I recognise and I look with absolute wonder as I see people journey from timidity and concern to open, confident realisation of their true self. That's lovely to behold. Remarkably my membership tells me that I am mid-way through my tenth year upon this site. I think I changed my description from Transvestite to Transexual after perhaps a year, but it was a much delayed written definition. So what on earth have I been playing at since, why I have failed to physical reconcile with my mind and spirit? Because I am a coward, oh, and because I am an 'honourable man'. There is no doubt that the veil of masculinity has slipped away, within my mind at least. My brain has disengaged with any attempt to be one of the boys and so I'm a peripheral male with an eye for all that is lady's. My son is upstairs asleep, my wife away and here I sit dressed, made-up and oh so content and at ease. Should the child upstairs awake then this will be a dream filled night for us both, one of us living the nightmare of exposure. I would commence upon Hormones tomorrow, now. My hair, recently cut doesn't currently require a wig to proclaim that gender of the head from which it sprouts. My breasts are false but the heart beneath connects to the mounds emphatically and pulls them close. I am thinking clearly, warmly, openly, positively and communicating with passion and freedom. I'm not thinking too much about what to type next, I'm watching the typos and this is where the stuttering takes hold. I'd like to be in a room, in a group now with Crissie, Katie, Lucy and friends knocking back a glass of wine perhaps and but in full release, with laughter hugs and undoubtably tears too. Next week I have enquired about attending a Transgender Support Group and should I attend this would be the first occasion where Rachel would introduce herself to a group, as a person rather than a online commodity. But will I go? 50:50 at the moment because I'm a coward upon the verge of a breakdown and an honorary man who has lost his masulinity and without which may be nobody. But that is wrong of course, because I'm a woman called Rachel. It's just that nobody knows and the isolation is slowly killing me. Warm Hugs Rachel x  
    May 11, 2017 382
  • 07 May 2017
    Hey ladies! So y'all know I work at a well known (mostly) women's clothing store. Yesterday about four of us "girls" are in the sorting room. "Annie" tells how "Lynn" told her she (Lynn) overheard one of the security guards, Tom, told a new security guard, Jim, how Annie is such a flirt and will "be all over you!" Annie was appalled! She said she is just being nice; Annie is very young, bubbly, fun young woman, about 24-25. We were all kind of laughing at this, along with Annie who was thinking the new guard is going to ask her out! But I DID feel kind of left out, I didn't have that experience growing up dealing with boys and unwanted attention. This is the difficult parts of transition, where you can't really relate to others experiences, feelings. You can't stand there nodding knowingly of those feelings. Awkward. Robin
    667 Posted by robin w
  • By robin w
    Hey ladies! So y'all know I work at a well known (mostly) women's clothing store. Yesterday about four of us "girls" are in the sorting room. "Annie" tells how "Lynn" told her she (Lynn) overheard one of the security guards, Tom, told a new security guard, Jim, how Annie is such a flirt and will "be all over you!" Annie was appalled! She said she is just being nice; Annie is very young, bubbly, fun young woman, about 24-25. We were all kind of laughing at this, along with Annie who was thinking the new guard is going to ask her out! But I DID feel kind of left out, I didn't have that experience growing up dealing with boys and unwanted attention. This is the difficult parts of transition, where you can't really relate to others experiences, feelings. You can't stand there nodding knowingly of those feelings. Awkward. Robin
    May 07, 2017 667